Walden

A Study of the Negro Policeman Book Review
A Study of the Negro Policeman Book Review
A Study of the Negro Policeman: Book Review by Nicholas Alex Appleton-Century-Crofts Copyright 1969 210 pages Intro. Criminal Justice December 2, 1996 Nicholas Alex, assistant professor of sociology at The City University of New York, holds a Ph.D. from the New School for Social Research and a B.S. from the Wharton School. He was formerly a research assistant with the Russell Sage Foundation, an instructor at Adelphi University, and has had working experience in his academic specialty-the socio
Henry David Thoreau
Henry David Thoreau
Henry David Thoreau The Great Conservationist, Visionary, and Humanist He spent his life in voluntary poverty, enthralled by the study of nature. Two years, in the prime of his life, were spent living in a shack in the woods near a pond. Who would choose a life like this? Henry David Thoreau did, and he enjoyed it. Who was Henry David Thoreau, what did he do, and what did others think of his work? Henry David Thoreau was born in Concord, Massachusetts on July 12, 1817 (Thoreau 96), on his gran
Henry David Thoreau was a rebel Walden can be seen as an account of hi
Henry David Thoreau was a rebel Walden can be seen as an account of hi
Henry David Thoreau was a rebel. Walden can be seen as an account of his rebellion. By the 1840's, life had changed throughout New England, even in the heart of America's rebellion, Concord, Massachusetts. Thoreau wrote that I have traveled a good deal in Concord (Krutch 108). He knew what he saw there, and what he saw, he began to despise. The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation (111). In 1775, ordinary men had dared to take up arms of rebellion and strike a blow for independence a
Henry David Thoreau and Herman Melville focused their writings on how
Henry David Thoreau and Herman Melville focused their writings on how
Henry David Thoreau and Herman Melville focused their writings on how man was affected by nature. They translated their philosophies though both the portrayal of their protagonist and their own self exploration. In Moby Dick, Melville writes about Ahab's physical and metaphysical struggle over the great white whale, Moby Dick, symbolic of man's struggle against the overwhelming forces of nature. Ahab's quest is reported and experienced through the eyes of Ishmael. Melville's use of the third pe
In his Poetics Plato contemplates the nature of aesthetics and existen
In his Poetics Plato contemplates the nature of aesthetics and existen
In his Poetics, Plato contemplates the nature of aesthetics and existence. He postulates that for every existing object and idea there is an absolute ideal which transcends human experience. He further concludes that art, including literature, is an aesthetic representation of real objects and ideas that is used to better understand their ideals. In theory, as an object becomes closer ideal it also becomes a better subject for the artist. American artists in particular have been given an in
Jerry Petercuskie
Jerry Petercuskie
Jerry Petercuskie English 201-03 Dr. E. Brinkley November 27, 1996 THOREAU AS A PROPHET Thoreau was a simple man that believed in having only the basic necessities in life. Thoreau lived a life of simplicity at Walden Pond. In Walden, Thoreau gives a background of his life and some life experiences that he has encountered. Thoreau also explains that the four necessities in life are food, shelter, clothing, and fuel. Thoreau was a prophet of the twentieth-century regarding the issue of materiali
If I were asked who my favourite Western Zen philosopher was without a
If I were asked who my favourite Western Zen philosopher was without a
If I were asked who my favourite Western Zen philosopher was, without any hesitation, I would declare it to be Henry David Thoreau. Although he knew in translation the religious writings of the Hindus, it may be unlikely that Henry David Thoreau ever studied the teachings of the Zen Masters. Even then, the insight within his own personal writings would irrefutably make him master of his own temple. The wisdom found within Thoreau's Walden can be clarified through Zen Buddhist beliefs and ideas
Globalization Human Development
Globalization Human Development
Globalization Human Development Kazakhstan and Pakistan Abstract Globalization provides opportunities for developing countries to progress economically and increase human development. This paper defines the difference between economic development and human development and shows that Pakistan is at the low end of human development, while Kazakhstan is at and average level, considered a middle income country. Human development goes beyond measures of GDP, literacy rates, and life expectancy. Fact
Leaves of Transcendentalism
Leaves of Transcendentalism
Leaves of Transcendentalism 10/19/03 Many of the major themes found in Walden can be found in some smaller form in the “Spring” chapter. They can also be found in Whitman’s Song of Myself: Leaves of Grass. Taking the passage from the middle of the “Spring” chapter, we can analyze many of the things Thoreau is saying. In this passage Thoreau is constructing a very complex metaphor for the transcendent quality of life as he sees it in leaves. He sees the structure of the leaf as the basic structur
A Comparison of Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emersons Beliefs
A Comparison of Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emersons Beliefs
A Comparison of Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Beliefs A Comparison of Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Beliefs concerning Simplicity, the Value and Potential of Our Soul, and Our Imagination. Henry David Thoreau tests Ralph Waldo Emerson’s ideas about nature by living at Walden Pond, where he discovers that simplicity in physical aspects brings deepness to our mind, our soul to its fullest potential, and our imagination to be uplifted to change our lives. These two m
An Investigation into the Primacy - Recency Serial Position Effects on
An Investigation into the Primacy - Recency Serial Position Effects on
An Investigation into the Primacy - Recency (Serial Position) Effects on Memory Abstract The general topic area is memory. The research is based on the primacy recency effect, by Murdock, (1962) and Glanzer and Cunitz, (1966). Aim: To investigate whether there is a relationship between the serial position effect, the position of words in a list and the amount of words freely recalled from that list. Alternative hypothesis: There will be a significant relationship between the serial position effe
Transcendentalism a philosophy emphasizing the intuitive and spiritual
Transcendentalism a philosophy emphasizing the intuitive and spiritual
“Transcendentalism: a philosophy emphasizing the intuitive and spiritual over the empirical”(Webster’s dictionary, 1993) The impact the transcendental movement had on American literature cannot be underestimated. “Reawakening an interest in the great problems of human nature and destiny,” authors such as Emerson, Alcott and Brownson, for example, forced the transcendental movement into the path of Henry David Thoreau. (Spiller, 346) As a self proclaimed “mystic, a transcendentalist, and a natur
Henry David Thoreau
Henry David Thoreau
Henry David Thoreau Henry spent the majority of his life walking in and around the town of Concord, although he did make few journeys to other places. Henry spent most of his time walking in the wilderness of Concord. Occasionally, he would be found sauntering and conversing with his mentor and friend, Ralph Waldo Emerson or Ellery Channing. Some believe Henry went to live at Walden Pond because he was a hermit or a recluse or because he hated his fellow man, but this is not the case. Henry had
I think that I love society as much as most and am ready enough to fas
I think that I love society as much as most and am ready enough to fas
I think that I love society as much as most, and am ready enough to fasten myself like a bloodsucker for the time to any full-blooded man that comes in my way. I am naturally no hermit, but might possibly sit out the sturdiest frequenter of the bar-room, if my business called me thither. I had three chairs in my house; one for solitude, two for friendship, three for society. When visitors came in larger and unexpected numbers there was but the third chair for them all, but they generally econom
I read the book Walden Two by BF Skinner It is about a utopian socie
I read the book Walden Two by BF Skinner It is about a utopian socie
I read the book Walden Two by B.F. Skinner. It is about a utopian society, which is quite a controversial topic. The morality, or as some say, immorality is low, or high, depending on how one looks at it. Different people have different opinions on living in such a society; nobody is right, nobody is wrong. Walden Two begins with a student, Steve Rogers, and his friend, Roger Jamnik, visiting their college Philosophy teacher from about 5 years before. They had gotten many wild ideas while i
Dead Poets Society is a collection of pious platitudes masquerading a
Dead Poets Society is a collection of pious platitudes masquerading a
`Dead Poets Society is a collection of pious platitudes masquerading as a courageous stand in favor of something: doing your own thing, I think. It's about an inspirational, unconventional English teacher and his students at the best prep school in America and how he challenges them to question conventional views by such techniques as standing on their desks. It is, of course, inevitable that the brilliant teacher will eventually be fired from the school, and when his students stood on their
Symbolism Portrayed in the Novel
Symbolism Portrayed in the Novel
Symbolism Portrayed in the Novel to Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 By Steven Johnson English 11 Honors Mrs. Karen Rose April 3, 1998 OUTLINE THESIS: The use of symbolism changes through the three sections of Fahrenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury. I. Part I: The Hearth and The Salamander A. The use of symbolism B. Comparison with other work II. Part II: The Sieve and The Sand A. The use of symbolism B. Comparison with other work III. Part III: Burning Bright A. The use of symbolism B. Comparison with o
There definitely seems to be a science to displaying merchandise to
There definitely seems to be a science to displaying merchandise to
There definitely seems to be a science to displaying merchandise to target one gender or the other. There also seems to be a science in drawing you in. For instance, the toy store was a store for both boys and girls. At the front of the store to get the children’s attention were items for both little boys and girls. Not only was the usual attention getters stores use to attract adult customers, this store also had to get the attention of both genders of the children. Besides being piled as
Thoreau Emerson's Disciple
Thoreau Emerson's Disciple
Thoreau: Emerson's Disciple During the Romantic era in American literature, transcendentalism emerged as a great literary movement. When speaking of the transcendentalists it is almost impossible to avoid mentioning Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau, probably the two most famous transcendentalists of all time. Emerson's ideas and thoughts are what inspired the entire movement and are also what inspired Thoreau. Many of his teachings and beliefs appear in Thoreau's actions and writings
Some believe Henry went to live at Walden Pond because he was a hermit
Some believe Henry went to live at Walden Pond because he was a hermit
Some believe Henry went to live at Walden Pond because he was a hermit or a recluse or because he hated his fellow man, but this is not the case. Henry had a very special and sincere reason to go to Walden Pond; to honor his brother. On January 11, 1842, Henry's brother, John Jr., died of lockjaw. It was his brother's death which prompted Henry to decide to go to Walden Pond. Ralph Waldo Emerson, the great Sage of Concord, owned land adjacent to Walden Pond and allowed Henry to live at Walden
Modern Transcendentalism
Modern Transcendentalism
Modern Transcendentalism In today's society, there are several distinct individuals and groups that are successfully acting with a modern version of the nineteenth century philosophy of Transcendentalism. While it is virtually impossible in the world today to completely abide by all of the Transcendental philosophies, the Boy Scouts of America have done well in adopting some of the major characteristics of this unique way of life. The Boy Scouts have shown, and continue to show, similar views w
Henry David Thoreau
Henry David Thoreau
Henry David Thoreau Henry David Thoreau was born in Concord, Massachusetts, on July 12, 1817. His ancestry was both Scottish and French. Around the age of ten or twelve, his parents would allow him to go hunting and fishing in the wilderness by himself. While attending Concord Academy, one of his studies included surveying. After he graduated from Harvard, he returned to Concord Academy to teach. After two years of teaching, he withdrew to work in his father's pencil factory. After a while, the
Caesar He was not on the whole a striking or compelling figure except
Caesar He was not on the whole a striking or compelling figure except
Caesar. He was not, on the whole, a striking or compelling figure except for one feature, his eyes, which were strong, serious, large, and deep set; bright blue in some light. Henry David Thoreau was fascinated by nature as he grew up and like all the other kids his age, he loved the countryside. Thoreau was a good student, who behaved somewhat shy and solemn with his classmates. He didn't really participate in what all the other kids did, so they nicknamed him, The Judge. From 1833 to 1837 T
July 1 1997 a significant date for all people in Hong Kong and much of
July 1 1997 a significant date for all people in Hong Kong and much of
July 1, 1997, a significant date for all people in Hong Kong and much of the Asian community. Hong Kong will be reverted to a powerful communist nation. Ironically, many of the world's communist countries are reverting to democratic governments. What will this date mean for, not only Southeast Asia, but for the rest of the world economic community, primarily the United States? Will Hong Kong still function, economically, as it does now or will power from People's Republic of China (China) quick
Henry David Thoreau
Henry David Thoreau
Henry David Thoreau The Great Conservationist, Visionary, and Humanist English He spent his life in voluntary poverty, enthralled by the study of nature. Two years, in the prime of his life, were spent living in a shack in the woods near a pond. Who would choose a life like this? Henry David Thoreau did, and he enjoyed it. Who was Henry David Thoreau, what did he do, and what did others think of his work? Henry David Thoreau was born in Concord, Massachusetts on July 12, 1817 (Thoreau 96), on
Henry David Thoreau
Henry David Thoreau
Henry David Thoreau Why was Henry David Thoreau such a wonderful writer? He had many great qualities, but the most important were his devotion to nature and writing, his desire for independence, and his experiences he encountered throughout his life. Henry David Thoreau looked to nature as the basis of life and writing. He believed that nature is the reflection of inner spiritual reality. He spent his life in search of the essentials of reality and of experiences that would bring him close to th
Henry David Thoreau
Henry David Thoreau
Henry David Thoreau He spent his life in voluntary poverty, enthralled by the study of nature. Two years, in the prime of his life, were spent living in a shack in the woods near a pond. Who would choose a life like this? Henry David Thoreau did, and he enjoyed it. Who was Henry David Thoreau, what did he do, and what did others think of his work? Henry David Thoreau was born in Concord, Massachusetts on July 12, 1817 ( Thoreau 96), on his grandmother's farm. Thoreau, who was of French-Huguenot
Trancendentalism
Trancendentalism
Trancendentalism TRANSCENDENTALISM A MODERN PHILOSOPHY Mankind has lost its place at the center of God’s universe. Now, when you watch the weather, or plants growing, or someone suddenly die, what you feel is obnoxious bafflement. In the past, you might have said God was responsible or the devil... Definitions of the universe based on speculation or on scriptural faith are no longer automatically accepted... You would have looked out on this vast and undefined universe in would’ve thought, a
Transcendentalis
Transcendentalis
Transcendentalis Transcendentalism was a literary movement in the first half of the 19th century. The philosophical theory contained such aspects as self-examination, the celebration of individualism, and the belief that the fundamental truths existed outside of human experience. Fulfillment of this search for knowledge came when one gained an acute awareness of beauty and truth, and communicated with nature to find union with the Over-Soul. When this occurred, one was cleansed of materialistic
Emily Dickinson Transcendentalist Experience Through Imagination
Emily Dickinson Transcendentalist Experience Through Imagination
Emily Dickinson: Transcendentalist Experience Through Imagination The early 19th century ideas of transcendentalism, which were introduced by Ralph Emerson and David Thoreau, where man as an individual becomes spiritually consumed with nature and himself through experience are contrasted by Emily Dickinson, who chose to branch off this path by showing that a transcendentalist experience could be achieved through imagination alone. These three monumental writers set the boundaries for this new re
BF Skinner's Waldo Two Positive Change In World Through Manipulation o
BF Skinner's Waldo Two Positive Change In World Through Manipulation o
B.F Skinner's Waldo Two: Positive Change In World Through Manipulation of Behavior B.F. Skinner, in his novel Walden Two, presents many arguments about how he foresees a positive change in the world through manipulation of behavior on the personal level. Sigmund Freud, in his works, specifically Civilization and Its Discontents, presents his view of human nature and what is innately problematic about it. Both Freud and Skinner agree that human behavior is the result of outside factors that sever
Self-reliance
Self-reliance
Self-reliance The idea of self-reliance is an American idea. Self-reliance is a way of life when one is reliant on one's own capabilities, judgment, and resources. When someone is self-reliant they are completely Independent. Many American authors have used examples of this idea, self-reliance, in a lot of their writing. For example, in a Progress to the Mines by Byrd examples of self-reliance are present. In the beginning of the story Byrd writes about a character who Ň... rode eight miles toge
Shinn Chen
Shinn Chen
Shinn Chen 3/22/04 English 11 H Period 1 Walden Chapter 3 In this chapter of Walden, Thoreau mainly analyzes the different aspects and interpretations of education. He begins by explaining that writing is the most mature form of communication and the most elegant. He then criticizes people for not taking the initiative to read the classics, such as Plato and Homer, which are the, as he says, the noblest recorded thoughts of man (80). When people get out of grade school, they do not exercise t
Shinn Chen
Shinn Chen
Shinn Chen 3/23/04 English 11 H Period 1 Walden Chapter 4 In this selection for Walden, Henry David Thoreau describes the silence and calmness of his isolated life at Walden Pond. He would often spend whole days simply sitting still and taking in the sights and sounds of nature and her beauty. He had the advantage over those who were obliged to look abroad for amusement, to society and the theater, that [his] life itself was become [his] amusement and never ceased to be novel (90). In his iso
Shinn Chen
Shinn Chen
Shinn Chen 3/24/04 English 11 H Period 1 Walden Chapter 5 In this chapter, Henry David Thoreau differentiates between solitude and loneliness. He declares that we are for the most part more lonely when we go abroad among men than when we stay in our chambers (108). In this quote, Thoreau claims that even when people are among others, they can still feel loneliness, because loneliness isn't a lack of physical interaction, but rather, emotional and spiritual interaction. Most friend ships are s
Shinn Chen
Shinn Chen
Shinn Chen 3/25/04 English 11 H Period 1 Walden Chapter 6 Chapter 6 of Walden by Henry David Thoreau, is titled Visitors and contains an entire section describing the innocence and ignorance of one of the visitors to Thoreau. This man was simple like Thoreau thought all men should be. He did not crowd his life with useless details, nor did he obsess over its superficialities. He takes life at face value and offers his own honest opinions about life, without pretending to be what he was not. Whi
Shinn Chen
Shinn Chen
Shinn Chen 3/28/04 English 11 H Period 1 Walden Chapter 7 In this chapter, Thoreau mainly describes his planting and harvesting of his bean plants. However, the larger theme he is trying to convey is one of acceptance of the way life turns out, even if it's undesirable. He explains that the farmer should not worry if some of his crops wither or are eaten by animals. These things are always inevitable so the farmer should relax and cease from anxiety (133). Nature looks upon our lives and our
Shinn Chen
Shinn Chen
Shinn Chen 3/29/04 English 11 H Period 1 Walden Chapter 8 This chapter from Walden, titled The Village, one of the most striking features is the way Thoreau uses animal imagery to describe the townspeople. He compares the villagers he says to birds, squirrels, and even prairie dogs. He says that he would often view these people the same way as if he was taking in the sights of nature. The village was its own environment with its own unique details and facets just like the forest. He compares t
Shinn Chen
Shinn Chen
Shinn Chen 3/31/04 English 11 H Period 1 Walden Chapter 9 In this chapter of Walden, titled The Ponds, Henry David Thoreau relates the ponds, especially Walden Pond, to something that is so pure that it surpasses the understanding of coarse and dull human beings. He describes the pond as something that has never aged, never changed under the pressures and effect of man; it is timeless and ageless. He describes the water as so pure that you can often see twenty to thirty feet to the bottom and
Shinn Chen
Shinn Chen
Shinn Chen 4/12/04 English 11 H Period 1 Walden Chapter 11 In this chapter from Walden, Thoreau pays homage to the two simultaneously contradictory and harmonic aspects of humanity: savage animal instincts and enlightened philosophical thought. Thoreau explains that he found in [himself], and still find, an instinct toward a higher, or, as it is named, spiritual life, as do most men, and another toward a primitive rank and savage one, and [he reverences] them both. While Thoreau believes that
Shinn Chen
Shinn Chen
Shinn Chen 4/19/04 English 11 H Period 1 Walden Chapter 17 In this chapter of Walden, Thoreau describes how Walden Pond transitions from a cold white winter into a fresh new spring. He describes the ice melting in the pond and the snow thawing out. Thaw with his gentle persuasion is more powerful than Thor with his hammer. The one melts, the other but breaks in pieces (247). With this quote, Thoreau explains that subtlety will prevail over brute force since Thaw will eventually melt down all
Shinn Chen
Shinn Chen
Shinn Chen 3/20/04 English 11 H Period 1 Walden: Chapter 2 This selection form Walden, by Henry David Thoreau, focuses mainly on living life as simply as possible. Thoreau explains that one of the main reasons he went to live by Walden Pond was because he wished to live so sturdily and Spartan-like as to put to rout all that was not life (72). Thoreau believes that by living simply, he will be able to live and enjoy life to the fullest, taking in each and every experience. By cutting life dow
Shinn Chen
Shinn Chen
Shinn Chen 4/10/04 English 11 H Period 1 Walden Chapter 10 In this chapter from Walden, Henry David Thoreau introduces another character to the short list. This character is named John Field and is an Irish farmer who lives in poverty with his wife and several children. Thoreau often tries to convince John to lead a simpler life much like him, but John does not believe in the feasibility of this idea. John Field measured his life upon the luxuries that he could afford, and he believed that his