Ventricle

Lyme Disease
Lyme Disease
Lyme Disease Lyme Arthritis ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Lyme disease is a tick-transmitted inflammatory disorder characterized by an early focal skin lesion, and subsequently a growing red area on the skin (erythema chronicum migrans or ECM). The disorder may be followed weeks later by neurological, heart or joint abnormalities. Symptomatology ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ The first symptom of Lyme disease is a skin lesion. Known as erythema chronicum migrans, or ECM, this usually begins as a red discoloration (macule) or
Euthanasia Should Be Abolished
Euthanasia Should Be Abolished
Euthanasia Should Be Abolished Euthanasia is the painless, intentional death of a person who is suffering. Euthanasia is wrong because it alters our natural way of survival, and upsets religous beliefs. By using euthanasia, “miraculous” recoveries have been prevented. People think that the easy way out of their problems is by conducting euthanasia. It is not a natural thing to commit suicide, and suffering is no excuse for death. Suffering is a part of nature, and we should not try to fix and p
Dementia What is Dementia Dementia is an organic brain syndrome which
Dementia What is Dementia Dementia is an organic brain syndrome which
Dementia What is Dementia ? Dementia is an organic brain syndrome which results in global cognitive impairments. Dementia can occur as a result of a variety of neurological diseases. Some of the more well known dementing diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), multi-infarct dementia (MID), and Huntington's disease (HD). Throughout this essay the emphasis will be placed on AD (also known as dementia of the Alzheimer's type, and primary degenerative dementia), because statistically it is the m
ANGINA PECTORIS
ANGINA PECTORIS
ANGINA PECTORIS ANGINA PECTORIS Submitted by: Course: SBI OAO To: Date: CONTENTS 3 Introduction 4 The Human Heart 5 Symptoms of Coronary Heart Disease 5 Heart Attack 5 Sudden Death 5 Angina 6 Angina Pectoris 6 Signs and Symptoms 7 Different Forms of Angina 8 Causes of Angina 9 Atherosclerosis 9 Plaque 10 Lipoproteins 10 Lipoproteins and Atheroma 11 Risk Factors 11 Family History 11 Diabetes 11 Hypertension 11 Cholesterol 12 Smoking 12 Multiple Risk Factors 13 Diagnosis 14 Drug Treatment 14 Nitra
Chapter 26 Reptiles Birds and Mammals Outline
Chapter 26 Reptiles Birds and Mammals Outline
Chapter 26 (Reptiles, Birds, and Mammals) Outline I. Reptiles A. Reptilian Adaptations to Terrestrial Life · Reptilian skin is dry and covered with tough, hard, platelike scales. · Reptilian skin is resistant to water loss because it contains large amounts of lipids and the protein keratin. · Keratin is the tough, wear-resistant material that composes your hair and fingernails. · Since the amniotic egg contains its own supply of water, reptiles need not travel to water to reproduce. · In the he
Congestive Heart Failure
Congestive Heart Failure
Congestive Heart Failure NS2: Aging 7 Long-term Care October 26, 2003 Congestive Heart Failure Congestive heart failure is a condition in which a weakened heart cannot pump enough blood to body organs resulting in the blood to backing up into body tissues. It is the most common cause of disability in the elderly. “More than 75 percent of patients with congestive heart failure are over the age of 65 years” (Porth, 2004, p. 337). The New York Heart Association classifies CHF into four categories.
Abnormal Behavior
Abnormal Behavior
Abnormal Behavior Lesson 8 Short Answer 1. Define abnormal behavior. Use your own words and avoid psychological jargon when possible. Abnormal behaviors are one of the fields of abnormal psychology, the area of psychological investigation concerned with understanding the nature of individual pathologies of mind, mood, and behavior. There are 7 kinds of abnormal behaviors: distress or disability – an individual experiences personal distress or disabled functioning, producing a risk of physical or
The Workings and Structure of the Heart
The Workings and Structure of the Heart
The Workings and Structure of the Heart Introduction For homeostasis to remain balanced throughout the body millions of respiring cells need to discard carbon dioxide and waste products and also replenish with oxygen and nutrients. For this transaction to occur a complex transportation network called the cardiovascular system initiates. The cardiovascular system consists of the heart, arteries and veins. The heart is a double pumping organ which is the driving force of the cardiovascular system,
Hoppy Heart Homework Assignment
Hoppy Heart Homework Assignment
“Hoppy” Heart Homework Assignment P-2 Class 17 EMSM 250 5/19/03 The human heart is a hollow, cone shaped organ that is relatively the size of a person’s fist. The apex of the heart is tilted obliquely and pointed towards the left hip and it rests on the diaphragm at approximately at the level of the fifth intercostal space, which is about the nipple line (Marieb 309). The heart weighs around 300 grams (10 oz.) in an adult. The heart is near the middle of the thoracic cavity in the mediastinum, w
Title
Title
title Period 6 Science Fair Research Title: ? I have chosen to do this project because, as an athlete myself, I have wondered what affects pulse rate. When coming across this project, I though it interesting to figure out what the difference in pulse rate was between athletes and non-athletes. The purpose of my experiment is to figure out whether or not, after strenuous exercise, the pulse rates stabilize faster in athletes than non-athletes. Pulse Rate The pulse rate is the number of times a pe
HEART
HEART
HEART The human heart is a specialized, four-chambered muscle that maintains BLOOD flow in the CIRCULATORY SYSTEM. Located in the thorax, it lies left of the body's midline, above and in contact with the diaphragm. It is situated immediately behind the breastbone, or sternum, and between the lungs, with its apex tilted to the body cavity's left side. In most people the apex can be felt during each heart contraction. At rest, the heart pumps about 59 cc (2 oz) of blood per beat and 5 l (5 qt) pe
THE HEART
THE HEART
THE HEART The human heart is a specialized, four chambered muscle that maintains blood flow in the circulatory system. The heart is located in the thorax, it lies left of the body's midline, above and in contact with the diaphragm. It is behind the breastbone, or sternum, and between the lungs, with its apex tilted to the body's cavity left side. In most people the apex can be felt during each heart contraction. When the heart is at rest, the heart pumps about 59cc (2 oz) of blood per heart bea
The media today concentrates intensely on drug and alcohol abuse homi
The media today concentrates intensely on drug and alcohol abuse homi
The media today concentrates intensely on drug and alcohol abuse, homicides, AIDS and so on. What a lot of people are not realizing is that coronary heart disease actually accounts for about 80% of all sudden deaths. In fact, the number of deaths from heart disease approximately equals to the number of deaths from cancer, accidents, chronic lung disease, pneumonia and influenza, and others, COMBINED.. (Smith, 117) One of the symptoms of coronary heart disease is angina pectoris. Unfortunately
Chapter 19 Summary
Chapter 19 Summary
Chapter 19 Summary The heart is no more than the transport system pump. The heart is about the size of a persons fist, weighs between 250 and 350 grams. The heart is enclosed within the mediastinum, extends about 5 inches from the second rib to the fifth intercostal space distally, site where its apex contacts the chest wall is referred to as the point of maximal intensity (PMI). The heart is enclosed in a double-walled fibrosis sac called the pericardium. The loosely fitting superficial part o
Compare and contrast the cardiovascular responses to exercise in a nor
Compare and contrast the cardiovascular responses to exercise in a nor
Compare and contrast the cardiovascular responses to exercise in a normal individual with an individual who has had a heart transplant. The cardiovascular system consists of a pump (the heart) and a series of tubes that enable the collection and distribution of blood to groups of thin vessels where exchange may occur with the nearby tissues. This continuous circulation is required to deliver nutrients, oxygen and other vital items to tissues around the body that need them. As well as this, unwa
The Human Heart
The Human Heart
The Human Heart Biology - Histology Abstract: Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary defines the heart as the viscus of cardiac muscle that maintains the circulation of the blood. It is divided into four cavities; two atria and two ventricles. The left atrium receives oxygenated blood from the lungs. From there the blood passes to the left ventricle, which forces it via the aorta, through the arteries to supply the tissues of the body. The right atrium receives the blood after it has passed
The Human Heart
The Human Heart
The Human Heart. Abstract: Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary defines the heart as the viscus of cardiac muscle that maintains the circulation of the blood . It is divided into four cavities; two atria and two ventricles. The left atrium receives oxygenated blood from the lungs. From there the blood passes to the left ventricle, which forces it via the aorta, through the arteries to supply the tissues of the body. The right atrium receives the blood after it has passed through the tissues
ANGINA PECTORIS
ANGINA PECTORIS
ANGINA PECTORIS Submitted by: Course: SBI OAO To: Date: CONTENTS 3 Introduction 4 The Human Heart 5 Symptoms of Coronary Heart Disease 5 Heart Attack 5 Sudden Death 5 Angina 6 Angina Pectoris 6 Signs and Symptoms 7 Different Forms of Angina 8 Causes of Angina 9 Atherosclerosis 9 Plaque 10 Lipoproteins 10 Lipoproteins and Atheroma 11 Risk Factors 11 Family History 11 Diabetes 11 Hypertension 11 Cholesterol 12 Smoking 12 Multiple Risk Factors 13 Diagnosis 14 Drug Treatment 14 Nitrates 14 Beta-bloc
Artificial Heart Devices
Artificial Heart Devices
Artificial Heart Devices In its never ending pursuit of advancement, science has reached a crucial biotechnological plateau, the creation of artificial organs. Such a concept may seem easy to comprehend until one considers the vast knowledge required to provide a functional substitute for one of nature's creations. One then realizes the true immensity of this breakthrough. Since ancient times, humans have viewed the heart as more than just a physical part of the body. It has been thought the sea
Cystic Fibrosis
Cystic Fibrosis
Cystic Fibrosis Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive trait on chromosome 7. This disorder affects chloride transport resulting in abnormal mucus production. This lifelong illness usually gets more severe with age and can affect both males and females. Symptoms and severity differ from person to person. Cystic fibrosis is the most common fatal inherited disease among whites and the major cause of chronic lung disease in children. 50% of people are expected to live to be 30, but a majority di
The Heart
The Heart
The Heart Introduction You need your heart for all your body needs. It pumps about 2000 gallons of blood a day. It takes about 20 seconds for blood to reach every cell in the body. An artery carries blood out from the heart. A vein carries blood back to the heart. An average adult heart weighs about 10-13 ounces (300 to 350 grams). The rate which the heart pumps varies depending on what your doing. When at rest the heart pumps more slowly. When you run the heart rate increases to provide muscles
The Circulatory System
The Circulatory System
The Circulatory System The circulatory system in anatomy and physiology is the course taken by the blood through the arteries, capillaries, and veins and back to the heart. In humans and the higher vertebrates, the heart is made up of four chambers the right and left auricles, or atria, and the right and left ventricles. The right side of the heart pumps oxygen-poor blood from the cells of the body back to the lungs for new oxygen; the left side of the heart receives blood rich in oxygen from th
Development of the Human Zygote
Development of the Human Zygote
Development of the Human Zygote November 16, 1995 Hundreds of thousands of times a year a single-celled zygote, smaller than a grain of sand, transforms into an amazingly complex network of cells, a newborn infant. Through cellular differentiation and growth, this process is completed with precision time and time again, but very rarely a mistake in the blueprint of growth and development does occur. Following is a description of how the pathways of this intricate web are followed and the mista
The Dog
The Dog
The Dog Domestic dog, carnivorous mammal, generally considered the first domesticated animal. The domesticated dog has coexisted with human beings as a working partner and household pet in all eras and cultures since the days of the cave dwellers. It is generally believed that the direct ancestor of the domestic dog is the wolf, originally found throughout Europe, Asia, and North America. Remains of a dog, estimated to be 10,500 years old, have been found in Idaho. TAXONOMY Kingdom: Animalia Phy
Schizophrenia
Schizophrenia
Schizophrenia Schizophrenia, severe mental illness characterized by a variety of symptoms, including loss of contact with reality, bizarre behavior, disorganized thinking and speech, decreased emotional expressiveness, and social withdrawal. Usually only some of these symptoms occur in any one person. The term schizophrenia comes from Greek words meaning split mind. However, contrary to common belief, schizophrenia does not refer to a person with a split personality or multiple personality. (For
SENILITY
SENILITY
SENILITY Senility is a disease commonly referred to as dementia. It affects 4 million Americans every year and is a major cause of disability in old age (Bunch, 1997, p. 106). Its prevalence increases with age (Bunch, 1997, p. 106). Dementia is characterized by a permanent memory deficit affecting recent memory in particular and of sufficient severity to interfere with the patient's ability to take part in professional and social activities (Bunch, 1997, p. 106). Although the aging process is a
While researching the mental disorder known as Schizophrenia I found t
While researching the mental disorder known as Schizophrenia I found t
While researching the mental disorder known as Schizophrenia, I found the subject to be rather broad. There are many different theories as to what causes this illness, and how we can prevent it and cure it. The purpose of this paper is to create a larger, general understanding of the mental disorder, while concentrating more on the symptoms that characterize Schizophrenia. Schizophrenia is a group of psychotic disorders characterized by disturbances in thought, perception, affect, behavior, and
Autism
Autism
Autism December 7,1999 Human Lifespan Human Lifespan December 7, 1999 Autism According to Sternberg (1995), autism is a syndrome of childhood characterized by a lack of social relationship, a lack of communication abilities, and highly restricted range of interest. Autism is also known as pervasive development disorder (PDD). Children who are autistic also lack in intellectual development. Autism occurs in 0.04% of the population and it is also four times more likely to occur in boys as in girls