To Maureen Peal

The Theme of Beauty in The Bluest Eye
The Theme of Beauty in The Bluest Eye
The Theme of Beauty in The Bluest Eye There is a saying that states that “beauty is in the eye of the beholder”. This means that everyone is beautiful in a unique way, depending on how others see them. For Pecola Breedlove, this was not a pleasant thought for her. Pecola is an 11-year-old, African-American girl from Toni Morrison’s novel, The Bluest Eye. Throughout the majority of her short life, Pecola struggles with the image of ideal beauty. Pecola has to go through many tough and humiliating
A Reality Of Presence
A Reality Of Presence
A Reality Of Presence In The Bluest Eye, Toni Morrison shows that anger is healthy and that it is not something to be feared; those who are not able to get angry are the ones who suffer the most. She criticizes Cholly, Polly, Claudia, Soaphead Church, the Mobile Girls, and Pecola because these blacks in her story wrongly place their anger on themselves, their own race, their family, or even God, instead of being angry at those they should have been angry at: whites. Pecola Breedlove suffered the
Bluest Eye
Bluest Eye
Bluest Eye Toni Morisson's novel The Bluest Eye is about the life of the Breedlove family who resides in Lorain, Ohio, in the late 1930s. This family consists of the mother Pauline, the father Cholly, the son Sammy, and the daughter Pecola. The novel's focal point is the daughter, an eleven-year-old Black girl who is trying to conquer a bout with self-hatred. Everyday she encounters racism, not just from white people, but mostly from her own race. In their eyes she is much too dark, and the dark