The Flathead Have

Flathead Road to Self-sufficiency
Flathead Road to Self-sufficiency
Flathead: Road to Self-sufficiency Before the Anglo American invaded the home of the Native Americans, Native Americans were successfully governing themselves. They managed to keep peace and administer justice though using their own customs, laws, and traditions. After the white invasion, the United States government recognized the need to let a “sovern nation” (such as the Indian nations) make and govern themselves by their own rules, “make their own laws and to be ruled by them”(Williams v Lee
References
References
References Bryan, William. (1996) Montana’s Indians Yesterday and Today. American and World Geographic Publishing. Clow, Lopach. (1990) Tribal Government Today. University Press of Colorado. Flathead Reservation Timeline. [online]. Available: www.edheritage.org/flathead/timelineflathead.htm [2003, April 1]. Flathead—The People. [online]. Available: http://www.mtsbc.org/fladhead.htm [2003, March 31]. Cases and Law Referenced Williams v Lee, 385 U.S. 217(1959) Public Law 280 Public Law 638 Indian
In Mark Twain's two major works The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and it's
In Mark Twain's two major works The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and it's
In Mark Twain's two major works, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, and it's sequel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, he develops and displays his humoristic abilities by concealing within them deeper meanings, ultimately producing a satire of the region in which he lived. Examined within this paper are the methods which Twain uses to conceal his satire within the above two novels. The majority of his points are made using humor, but he also takes advantage of the use of southwestern dialect and Hu