The 54th Massachusetts

Buffalo Soldiers
Buffalo Soldiers
Buffalo Soldiers Buffalo Soldiers was the name given to African-American cavalrymen by their native-American antagonists during the Indian Wars in the post-Civil War American West. The first men to serve in all-black army units did so in the Union Army, during the Civil War. The initial all-black regiment, the 54th Massachusetts, trained by its white commander, Col. Robert G. Shaw, suffered heavy casualties in a heroic, though unsuccessful attempt to capture Fort Wagner at Charleston (S.C.) h
African-American Troops in the Civil War The 54th Massachusetts
African-American Troops in the Civil War The 54th Massachusetts
African-American Troops in the Civil War: The 54th Massachusetts The Fifty-fourth Massachusetts was organized in early 1863 by Robert Gould Shaw, twenty-six year old member of a prominent Boston abolitionist family. Shaw had earlier served in the Seventh New York National Guard and the Second Massachusetts Infantry, and was appointed colonel of the Fifty-fourth in February 1863 by Massachusetts governor John A. Andrew. As one of the first black units organized in the northern states, the Fifty-
COLORED TROOPS IN UNITED STATES HISTORY
COLORED TROOPS IN UNITED STATES HISTORY
COLORED TROOPS IN UNITED STATES HISTORY UNITED STATES COLORED TROOPS Before Fort Sumter, South Carolina was fired upon on April 12, 1861, seven states in the deep south had seceded from the Union, and a Convention was held in Montgomery, Alabama which adopted a Constitution and elected Jefferson Davis as President of the Confederate States of America. Shortly thereafter, four more states seceded, Virginia, Arkansas, Tennessee, and North Carolina. Slave states remaining in the Union were Missouri
Civil War Timeline - US History
Civil War Timeline - US History
Civil War Timeline - US History Fort Sumter Attacked April 12, 1861 - At 4:30 a.m. Confederates under Gen. Pierre Beauregard open fire with 50 cannons upon Fort Sumter in Charleston, South Carolina. The Civil War begins. April 14, 1861. - Fort Sumter after its capture, showing damage from the Rebel bombardment of over 3000 shells and now flying the Rebel Stars and Bars April 17, 1861 - Virginia secedes from the Union, followed within five weeks by Arkansas, Tennessee, and North Carolina, thus
Frederick Douglass
Frederick Douglass
Frederick Douglass Frederick Douglass On an unknown date in 1817, on a slave plantation in Tuckahoe Maryland, Frederick August Washington Bailey was born. Frederick was raised in a house on the plantation with all the other slave children. At the age of seven, like many other slaves, Frederick was put to work in the fields. As a young child he would wonder why he was a slave, and why everyone can't be equal. His thoughts frequently came back to him, leaving him with a great hatred for slavery. I
From Oppressed Slaves to Champion Soldiers
From Oppressed Slaves to Champion Soldiers
From Oppressed Slaves to Champion Soldiers They [Black soldiers] will turn and run at the first sight of the enemy! (Emilio 10) This is just a small example of the doubt and hatred that was bestowed on the African American soldiers. However, during the war, they proved themselves to be brave and courageous men on and off the battlefield on many occasions. Despite deep prejudices and harsh criticisms from the white society, these men were true champions of patriotism. The cause of the Civil War w
Harriet tubman
Harriet tubman
harriet tubman written by Shawnda Fletcher Harriet Ross Tubman was an African American who escaped slavery and then showed runaway slaves the way to freedom in the North for longer than a decade before the American Civil War. During the war she was as a scout, spy, and nurse for the United States Army. After that she kept working for rights for blacks and women. Harriet Tubman was originally named Araminta Ross. She was one of 11 children born to Harriet Greene and Benjamin Ross on a plantation
Slavery And Participation In The Civil War
Slavery And Participation In The Civil War
Slavery And Participation In The Civil War The foundation for black participation in the Civil War began more than a hundred years before the outbreak of the war. Blacks in America had been in bondage since early colonial times. In 1776, when Jefferson proclaimed mankindís inalienable right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, the institution of slavery had become firmly established in America. Blacks worked in the tobacco fields of Virginia, in the rice fields of South Carolina, and
African Americans in the Civil War
African Americans in the Civil War
African Americans in the Civil War In the history of the United States, African Americans have always been discriminated against. When Africans first came to America, they were taken against their will and forced to work as laborers. They became slaves to the rich, greedy, lazy Americans. They were given no pay and often badly whipped and beaten. African Americans fought for their freedom, and up until the Civil War it was never given to them. When the Civil War began, they wanted to take part i