Religion Page 6

Racism Today “...Everybody jumped on him. beat the hell out of him... Everybody was hitting him or kicking him. One guy was kicking at his spine. Another guy hitting on the side of his face... He was unconscious. He was bleeding. Everybody had blood on their forearms. We ran back up the hill laughing... He should have died.... He lost so much blood he turned white. He got what he deserved” (Ridgeway 167.) The skinheads who performed this random act of racial violence in 1990, had no reason to b
Religion in Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte addresses the theme of Religion in the novel Jane Eyre using many characters as symbols. Bronte states, Conventionality is not morality. Self-righteousness is not religion(preface v). In Jane Eyre, Bronte supports the theme that customary actions are not always moral through the conventional personalities of Mrs. Reed, Mr. Brocklehurst, and St. John Rivers. The novel begins in Gateshead Hall when Jane must stay away from her aunt and cousins because she
Religious Persecution: An underlying theme in The Lord of the Flies Like many excellent works, William Golding's novel, The Lord of the Flies can be read on many different levels. It is possible to read the book literally, as a mere story about boys marooned on an island. It is also possible to read the book as an indictment of the nature of man - as being pure evil without society's boundaries. A further analysis of The Lord of The Flies reveals something else - the novel has many references t
Coleridge's poem The Rime of the Ancient Mariner is wrote in a way that the reader is expected to temporarily allow him or herself to believe it to be able to understand it. The poem itself is about a Mariner who is telling his tale of sin and forgiveness by God to a man referred to as the Wedding Guest. The Mariner is supposedly responsible for the death of all of the crew on his ship because of his killing of a creature which was to bring them the wind that they needed to put power into the
Greece The Greek peninsula has been culturally linked with the Aegean Islands, and the west coast of Asia Minor since the Neolithic Age. The numerous natural harbors and close-lying islands lead to a unified, maritime civilization. However cultural unity did not produce political unity. Mountain ranges and deep valleys separated the peninsula into small economic and political units. Constant feuding between cities and surrounding empires for political power made Greece the sight of many battles
ANCIENT GREECE Ancient Greece is a peninsula located off the Mediterranean Sea, and is surrounded by several islands. Ancient Greece was made up of different types of government. There were two types of city states an oligarchy , which is ruled by a small group of citizens and a direct democracy ruled by the people . All citizens could make speeches and vote at the Assembly. The Council made up of 500 citizens made new laws which were debated in the Assembly . Only citizens could vote ,women ,f
Legacies: In the ancient days, when culture, as well as civilizations were developing, many things came to be known as options for later cultures. Civilizations had different ways of doing things and therefore each of their cultures differed considerably. The Romans, the Greeks and the Hebrews all presented different legacies to the world. The Romans actually gave a legacy from their political, and economic systems. From the political system they gave us two forms of working government. There w
The Rise of Gladiatorial Combat Gladiatorial contests (munera gladitoria), hold a central place in our perception of Roman behavior. They were also a big influence on how Romans themselves ordered their lives. Attending the games was one of the practices that went with being a Roman. The Etruscans who introduced this type of contest in the sixth century BC, are credited with its development but its the Romans who made it famous. A surviving feature of the Roman games was when a gladiator fell h
The Greeks thought of their Gods as having the same needs as human beings, they believed that the Gods needed somewhere to live on Earth. Temples were built as the gods' earthly homes. The basic design of temples developed from the royal halls of the Maycenaean Age. A Mycenaean palace consisted of a number of buildings often more than one story high, grouped around a central courtyard. It was brightly painted, both inside and out. In each palace there was a large hall called a megaron, where th
Greek literature GREEK LITERATURE. The great British philosopher-mathematician Alfred North Whitehead once commented that all philosophy is but a footnote to Plato . A similar point can be made regarding Greek literature as a whole. Over a period of more than ten centuries, the ancient Greeks created a literature of such brilliance that it has rarely been equaled and never surpassed. In poetry, tragedy, comedy, and history, Greek writers created masterpieces that have inspired, influenced, and
The Trojan War took place in approximately the 13th century. The ancient Greeks defeated the City of Troy. The Trojan War started after an incident at the wedding feast of Peleus, the king of Thessaly, and Thetis, a sea goddess. All the gods and goddesses of Mt. Olympus had been invited except Eris, the goddess of discord. Eris was offended and tried to stir up trouble among the guests at the feast. She sent a golden apple inscribed “For the most beautiful.” Hera, Athena, and Aphrodite each cla
The Theater of Dionysus The Theater of Dionysus was Europe’s first theater, and stood immediately below the Parthenon in Athens, Greece. It was originally built in the late 5th century B.C. The theater was an outdoor auditorium in the shape of a great semicircle on the slope of the Acropolis, with rows of seats on which about eighteen thousand spectators could comfortably seat. The front rows consisted of marble chairs, and were the only seats in the theater that had a back support. The priests
Samuel Taylor Coleridge, to those who know and understand his poems well, exists in three modes, as Philosopher, Poet, Friend. If the truth were told, we should all be obliged to admit that the Philosopher escapes us. It is the opinion of many that Coleridge as Poet is almost equally an evanescent shadow; and though the many are in this quite mistaken, they have some excuse for thinking thus, because his fulfillment falls far short of his promise. Due to Coleridge’s complex styles of writing, t
Satire Joseph Heller who is perhaps one of the most famous writers of the 20th century writes on some emotional issues such as war. He does not deal with these issues in the normal fashion instead he criticizes them and the institutions that help carry these things out. Heller in fact goes beyond criticizing he satirizes. Throughout his two major novels Catch-22 and Good as Gold he satirizes almost all of America’s respectful institutions. To truly understand these novels you must recognize tha
In Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, life is centered around a rigid, Puritanistic-structured society in which one is unable to divulge his or her innermost thoughts and secrets. Every human being needs the opportunity to express how they truly feel, or the emotion is bottled up until it becomes volatile. Unfortunately, Puritan society did not permit this expression, so characters had to seek alternate means in order to relieve themselves. Luckily, at least for the four main characters,
Semantics Essay Would you rather belong to the Apple Dumpling Gang or the Crypts? The connotation of the word gang reaches hit an all time low in the 1990's. We envision today's gang members as drug lords who kill each other on street corners. Society rejects and imprisons them. Once members of a gang simply shared common interests and enjoyed social acceptance, much as members of a club today. Many pairs of words have experienced a similar disagreement in connotation throughout the yea
For centuries evil was defined by human preoccupation, and it was often indicated in the English literature. From Beowulf to Macbeth, people’s perception on the nature of evil had matured and became more complex. In Beowulf’s period, evil was simply defined based on outer appearances and actions. The author of Beowulf described the evil Grendel as a fearsome monster: He(with sharp claws)…snatched up thirty men, smashed them. For the same reason, Grendel’s mother was also considered evil altho
When attempting to read criticism of Shakespeare plays one idea is clear: if the review was written more than five or ten years ago the essay is likely to be exclusive when it comes to the women in Shakespeare. Little attention had been given to the women of Shakespeare prior to the seventies feminist movement. The women in King Lear deserve attention just as women in every Shakespearean play do. A common idea among critics is that the women perpetuated evil and were not worthy of acknowledgmen
January 21, 1994 Shylock-Victim or Villain In 1594 the Earl of Essex, an English Nobleman who lived during the Elizabethan period in England, was actively involved in the persecution and trials of Roderigo Lopez. Lopez was a Jew of Portuguese descent, who was wrongly accused of attempting to poison the Queen of England, for reasons never fully explained. Lopez, being the Queen's royal physician, was in no position to defend himself once he was accused. Essex, who provided the evidence also pres
gling through such things as the depression, the Dust Bowl summers, and trying to provide for their own families, which included finding somewhere to travel to where life would be safe. Such is the story of the Joads. The Joads were the main family in John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath, a book which was written in order to show what a family was going through, at this time period, and how they were trying to better their lives at the same time. It wouldn’t be enough for Steinbeck to simply wr
Shakespeare uses similar comic elements to effect similar outcomes in his works. Many of his plays utilize trickery and disguise to accomplish similar endings. Trickery plays a major role in The Merchant of Venice and drives most of the action, while mistaken identity, specifically Portia's disguise as the learned attorney's representative, plays a major role in the resolution of the play. The first instance of trickery in the play is Bassanio's plan to present himself as a financially sound
The Merchant Of Venice Act 1 In the fist act, Antonio is introduced as the Merchant of Venice. A friend of him, Bassanio, desperately needs money because all of his money is on his ships and he wants to go to Belmont to visit the woman of his dreams, Portia. Therefore he goes to Antonio to ask if he is willing to go to Shylock and ask him if he can have 3000 ducats. Antonio agrees and goes to Shylock and explains that he has to pay it back within 3 months. If he doesn’t do this, he may cut one
All men are created equal is one of the declarations that American culture is built on. This declaration means that all men no matter of race, religion, or creed are equals in the eyes of society, as well as the law. This was not always true in history, especially not in Shakespeare’s day and age. During this time, society had levels of classification where men were considered superior to other men. Shakespeare gives us a taste of this hierarchical culture through his play The Tempest. He s
Of all different kinds of cancer, skin cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in the United States. Skin cancer is a disease which cancer cells are found on the outer layers of the skin. Your skin protects the body from heat, infection, light, injury and infection. It also stores fat, water, and vitamin D. The skin has two layers and several different kinds of cells. With a certain lifestyle these cells can become cancerous.(Prodigy Web Browser: An Introduction to skin Cancer {NET
          In Some Dreamers of the Golden Dream, the author Didion uses fiery imagery to parallel the San Bernardino Valley to hell.  It is a place where the hills blaze up spontaneously, and every voice seems a scream. (p.3)  Didions hellish descriptions of the geography reflect the culture of San Bernardino Valley.  It is where the hot wind blows and the old ways do not seem relevant, where the divorce rate is double the national average. (p.4)  In this culture, the importance of  the
Book Report: Aldous Huxley's: A Brave New World Huxley's point of view in Brave New World is third person, omniscient (all-knowing). The narrator is not one of the characters and therefore has the ability to tell us what is going on within any of the characters' minds. This ability is particularly useful in showing us a cross section of this strange society of the future. We can be with the Director of Hatcheries and Conditioning in the Central London Conditioning and Hatchery Centre, with Leni
There are two main reasons why I have chosen Summer: The Way to Highland Park as my essay. My first reason is I love the city. In the city there is an essence of the past, marred by the shameful present. Kazin captures this feeling of the city to the point you can almost smell the city. His scents and sights bring this story to life. This brings me to the other reason I chose this story. I find Alfred Kazin’s view of the world as refreshing. I find the world to be a beautiful place and I think
Symbol Use Within Two Short Stories The authors, Shirley Jackson and Nathaniel Hawthorne, both frequently use symbols within their stories The Lottery and Young Goodman Brown. Symbols are utilized as an enhancement tool to stress the theme of each story. Hawthorne uses names and objects to enhance the theme, and Jackson mainly utilizes names to stress the theme, although she does have one object as a symbol of great importance to the theme. The stories both contain symbols describing evil.
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Questions 1. Compare and Contrast Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn. Although Tom and Hucklberry Finn have many things in common and are very good friends, they also live a life of two totally different lifestyles. Tom, who is a dreamer, lives a life out of romantic novels, and can be amusing and exasperating at the same time. He lives a life out of drama and brings out his imagination in a realistic way. He is amusing when showing his understanding of what he h
Through their writing, Karl Marx and Matthew Arnold show their opposing views on the importance of internal and external functions of culture. In the first chapter of Culture and Anarchy, Sweetness and Light, Arnold describes culture as being responsible for the progress of politics and society and as the best knowledge and thought of the time (19). Matthew Arnold’s culture is based on two main aspects, religion and education. Karl Marx, however, strongly contrasts Arnold’s ideas. Marx view
The Crucible What creative ways we humans invent for persecuting each other. Isn’t it amazing that despite all our scientific and humanitarian advances we, as a race, still feel the need to persecute each other? The Crucible is set in Salem, Massachusetts during the famous witch hunt held there in the late seventeenth century, but it was written in the United States during the famous witch hunt held there in the 1950s. Isn’t it simply astounding how similar these events are? They are incomprehe
James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is a novel of complex themes developed through frequent allusions to classical mythology. The myth of Daedalus and Icarus serves as a structuring element in the novel, uniting the central themes of individual rebellion and discovery, producing a work of literature that illuminates the motivations of an artist, and the development of his individual philosophy. James Joyce chose the name Stephen Dedalus to link his hero with the mythical Greek
Winnie Yang Oct. 29, 1996 Hon. English III Hour I The Effects and Implications of Sin in The Scarlet Letter Sin is the transgression of a moral code designated by either society or the transgressor. The Puritans of Boston in the novel, The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, establish a rigid moral code by which to purge their society of deviants. As this society is inherently theocratic, the beliefs and restrictions established by religion are not only incorporated into law but constitute
The Enlightenment and the Role of the Philosophes The Enlightenment is a name given by historians to an intellectual movement that was predominant in the Western world during the 18th century. Strongly influenced by the rise of modern science and by the aftermath of the long religious conflict that followed the Reformation, the thinkers of the Enlightenment (called philosophes in France) were committed to secular views based on reason or human understanding only, which they hoped would provide
Euthanasia, also mercy killing, practice of ending a life so as to release an individual from an incurable disease or intolerable suffering. The term is sometimes used generally to refer to an easy or painless death. Voluntary euthanasia involves a request by the dying patient or that person's legal representative. Passive or negative euthanasia involves not doing something to prevent death—that is, allowing someone to die; active or positive euthanasia involves taking deliberate action to caus
In The Crucible, a play written by Arthur Miller, the strict Puritan community of Salem is bombarded with the hysteria of witchcraft. It starts when five young girls of Salem are caught dancing in the forest. Instead as mere children playing, this behavior is viewed upon by the Puritans as the work of the devil. As the hysteria builds momentum, more and more accusations radiate. Reverend Hale, a well known expert on witches, is brought into Salem to 'cleanse' the town of it's evil. At the begin
The Fear of Science To live in the today's world is to be surrounded by the products of science. For it is science that gave our society color television, the bottle of aspirin, and the polyester shirt. Thus, science has greatly enhanced our society; yet, our society are still afraid of the effect of science. This fear of science can be traced back to the nineteenth century where scientist had to be secretative in experimenting with science. Although science did wonders in the nineteenth centur
“The Flight” In the Flight author Steinbeck uses Naturalism in his story. Naturalism is the theory that there are greater forces that control our lives. In the Flight, a boy named Pepe kills a man and is forced to leave his home and go out on his own. In his adventure he encounters many difficulties and he counters it with his actions. One of his difficulties was his new environment and one of his counters was his religion. After Pepe left his home, his sister already knew his fate. She already
Many writers in American literature try to instill the philosophy of their choosing into their reader. This is often a philosophy derived at from their own personal experiences. John Steinbeck is no exception to this. When traveling through his native Californian in the mid-1930s, Steinbeck witnessed people living in appalling conditions of extreme poverty due to the Great Depression and the agricultural disaster known as the Dust Bowl. He noticed that these people received no aid whatsoever fr
Many great literary novels have the protagonist, the main character of the novel, being portrayed as the hero. There are many different deeds and actions that can characterize a person as a hero such as saving someone from a burning house at the risk of one's own life. The main distinguishing characteristic of a true hero is self-sacrifice, whether it be scarifice of your own personal desires or ideals or sacrifice of physical well being to help others. There are a few novels in which the mai
The Mill on the Floss is a book written by George Eliot, whose real name is Mary Anne (later Marian) Evans. There is a great deal of autobiography in this book. The facts of Mary Anne's life do not match Maggie Tulliver, but there is an obvious reflection of her own life. Book One: Chapter1-13 The novel opens up with a description of the countryside around the town of St. Ogg's and the river Floss. In the second chapter Maggie, Mr. Tulliver, Mrs. Tulliver, and Mr. Riley are introduced. Mr. Tull
Survey of American Literature November 13, 1996 THE NEW LAND OF NEW IDEAS The 18th century Americans turned their backs on the old ideas of the Puritans. The Puritans believed in the population acting within the religious ways of the times. The 18th century population turned their lifestyles to a lifestyle of self interest. This lifestyle was dedicated to the goal of obtaining wealth and prestige among the community. DeCrevecouer writes: He is arrived on a new continent; a modern society offers
Article: Bible offers remedy for nation’s reaping what it has sowed, Rev. Jim Williams. Orlando Sentinel Tribune, Section: Osceola Sentinel, page 5; August 24, 1996 Researching the issue of the right to bear arms was somewhat difficult at first because I really did not know what to focus on. I did find this article, though, and it really interested me because of the different perspective it took on the issue. The article starts off with a quote from the Bible, so the reader knows right away t
2/13/97 The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam presents an interesting challenge to any reader trying to sort through its heavy symbolism and not-so-obvious theme. Not only does the poem provide us with a compelling surface story, but a second look at the text can reveal a rich collection of seperate meanings hidden in the poem's objective descriptions and sprawling narrative-which in the space of a few pages includes such disparate characters as the Moon, God, the Snake (and his traditional Christian ne
The Sun Also Rises Take-home Test by Matt Grier Literary Analysis and Composition 5th Period Mrs. Joan Leary January 6th, 1997 1. Although Jake is dedicated to his work, discuss the fact that his choice of friends, Harvey Stone, Bill Gorton, Mike Campbell, and Lady Brett Ashley suggest that his own life lacks depth and commitment. While Jake Barnes has some dedication and ethics, he leads a life that lacks depth and commitment-just like the lives that his friends live. Jake, though he tries not
The Unholy Crusade Religion is a canopy under which American culture and society thrives. Its extension reaches the boundaries of such cultural mainstreams as movies, television, and music. Oliver Stone's 1986 war film Platoon is an example of the religious subtleties and overtones that appear in various American genres. Stone not only uses religious themes to portray the Vietnam War, but manipulates the war to show the decadence of American society. Throughout history, man has traveled the wor
Aldous Huxley, in his distopian novel,- Brave New World, written in 1932 presents a horrifying view of a possible future in which society has become a prisoner of the very technology it hoped would save us. In -Brave New World Huxley's distortion of technology, religion, and family values, is much more effective than his use of literary realism found in his depiction of a savage reservation. Through his use of distortion Huxley tells a classic tale with the theme of, be careful what you wish
There is no avoiding war; it can only be postponed... (Machiavelli) Indeed, this is true, as war has been a part of human culture since the beginning of time. Battles will be fought and wars will wage on; there is nothing that can be done. No matter how many pacts are signed, no matter how extraordinary the leader is, and no matter what race or religion, fighting is as unavoidable as the plague. The Renaissance brought tremendous enlightenment and development across Europe. Individuals were b
There is an epidemic in our country, and it is growing stronger daily. Someone is not being allowed to live her/ his life to the fullest degree because of this disease. Its traits can be found in every city, town, and state across the country. No, this epidemic is not AIDS or cancer: however, if left alone, its long term effects can be just as detrimental. The name of the epidemic is censorship, and last year, the number of censorship cases in the school systems across America reached a new hig
Yaniv Schiller 10/31/96 Mrs. C. English Essay Why the Name ‘Things Fall Apart’ There was a man who dreamed as a child of being well known and respected throughout his village and neighboring villages. This man, Okonko, worked hard at his goal, and he achieved it. Okonko, a man with great strength and personality, had achieved his goal to become rich and famous, a privilege that was unseen before in his family. Although Okonko reached his goal at an early age, his life began to Fall Apart when t