Federalists

A Definite Difference of Opinions
A Definite Difference of Opinions
A Definite Difference of Opinions During the development of the young country of the United States of America, everyone had the ability to include their opinions on any subject. But many times, only a few voices were actually listened to. In this case Thomas Jefferson, a Republican, and Alexander Hamilton, a Federalist, were two of the most prominent people in the production of this government. Although disagreement was very common with these two, their contradictions definitely attributed to t
Decline of the American Empire
Decline of the American Empire
Decline of the American Empire In any era there are different protagonists, playing the same game on a similar board. Like a game of monopoly, there are nations competing to become the foremost leaders of their time. They amass great wealth, powerful armies, and political sway. When the influence and might of these countries transcends the confines of their boundaries, so that they become a presence throughout the world, they become empires. At times, it seems as though one of these empires win
Sam Adams
Sam Adams
Sam Adams Every so often, a man of true passion is born. A man exceedingly dedicated to his principles, and very firm in his beliefs. Samuel Adams was such a man. Adams was a patriot, and one of the more influential men in the colonies. However, even as a patriot, he did not support the Constitution. How could such a patriot be an anti-federalist? Once again, it all comes down to an issue of beliefs. Samuel Adams was born on September 27, 1722. He was the son of a successful merchant and malter.
All I Know Is What I Read In The Papers - Will Rogers
All I Know Is What I Read In The Papers - Will Rogers
All I Know Is What I Read In The Papers - Will Rogers There have been many criteria over the past few centuries that measured one's political clout and influence: divine right, property, money, and acquaintances. In the twentieth century, particularly the past two decades, the political power to influence others resides in information: the more information you have and the more you know how to use it, the more potential influence you have. People rely on the media for their information, as it
The New Federalist Party
The New Federalist Party
The New Federalist Party Part I As the sole member of the New Federalist party, it is with great honors that I now present to you the very first New Federalist platform. PREAMBLE The growing dissension between the two major political parties today has drawn them away from the public's views. It has been determined that the citizens of the United States cannot get what they want from the current major parties. Because of this, a total reconstruction of the current political structure is in dire n
The Power of The Judiciary
The Power of The Judiciary
The Power of The Judiciary Albert Lairson Professor Mitchell When the founding fathers of our country, and by that I mean the Federalists, were creating the system of government for America, they knew that a separation of power would be necessary to protect the American people from the evils of a monarchy or dictatorship. In doing this, they created the three branches of government; Legislative, Executive, and Judiciary. The plan was to have the Legislative make the laws, Executive enforce the l
The Press and Media Cause Rampant Swaying of the Election Votes Throug
The Press and Media Cause Rampant Swaying of the Election Votes Throug
The Press and Media Cause Rampant Swaying of the Election Votes Through Their Opinions and Reports Today, the press and media cause rampant swaying of the vote through their own opinions and reports. People are often misled with half-truths and believable rumors that can aid or ruin an election. Journalists and the newspapers often print things too hastily, without first investigating the truth or at least both sides of a story. Candidates abuse the media, using money as a pass to publicly sland
Time For Reform Considering The Failures of The Electoral College
Time For Reform Considering The Failures of The Electoral College
Time For Reform? Considering The Failures of The Electoral College Description: This paper discusses the many shortcomings of the Electoral College, and posits possible alternative electoral processes which likely be more democratic. Time for Reform? Considering the failures of the Electoral College A common misconception among American is that when they vote they elect the President. The truth is not nearly this simple. What in fact happens when a person votes is that there vote goes for an Ele
The Early Nineteenth Centory
The Early Nineteenth Centory
The Early Nineteenth Centory The early nineteenth century was an era of tremendous growth and change for the new nation. This is a thesis statement that will be proven true in my essay. And why don't I begin with one of our greatest presidents, Thomas Jefferson. On March fourth, 1801, Thomas Jefferson was elected President of the United States of America. Thomas Jefferson was a Republican. Republicans strongly supported farmers, and they wanted an agrarian nation. An agrarian nation means some
The Reign of Terror
The Reign of Terror
The Reign of Terror History is said to be written by the winners, but is it possible to rewrite history? In a way, the French, like many who have preceded them, and many who will proceed them have done the impossible, rewriting history. From trivial folklore, such as George Washington chopping down a cherry tree, to the incredibly wrong, the African slave trade; people's views of history can be shaped and molded. The French have done a superb job of instilling all of us with the concept that th
John adams-1
John adams-1
John adams John Adams, who became the second president of the United States, has been accused by some historians of being the closest thing America ever had to a dictator or monarch (Onuf, 1993). Such strong accusations should be examined in the context of the era in which Mr. Adams lived and served. A closer examination of the historical events occurring during his vice presidency and his term as president, strongly suggests that Adams was not, in fact, a dictator. Indeed, except for his lack
A Biographical Report on
A Biographical Report on
A Biographical Report on Thomas Fitzsimons Thomas Fitzsimons, or Fitzsimmons as his last name was sometimes spelled, was born during 1741 and died on August 26, 1811. Originally from Ireland, as young man he immigrated to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to start a career as a merchant. On November 23, 1761, he married Catharine Meade. A few months later, with his brother-in- law, he formed an extensive mercantile and commercial business which traded chiefly with the West India Islands. In 1782 Fitzs
Bill Clinton -
Bill Clinton -
Bill Clinton - Redefines Democratic-Republican In the early 1800's, the United States was but a promising seedling in search of viable political direction. The initial parties were known as the federalists and the Democratic-Republicans, the first of which soon diminished and the later eventually bisected. The result is the two party Democrat and GOP system which the majority of politicians of current day subscribe. However, many political and economic analysts find themselves perplexed by an i
Growth of NYS Business
Growth of NYS Business
Growth of NYS Business April 17, 1996 For a number of reasons, business enterprise in New York grew by leaps and bounds between 1825 and 1860. New York's growth between the years 1825 and 1860 can be attributed to a number of factors. These include but cannot be limited to the construction of the Erie Canal, the invention of the telegraph, the developed of the railroads, the establishment of Wall Street and banking, the textile, shipping, agriculture and newpaper industries, the development of
The English-French relations have not always been easy Each is always
The English-French relations have not always been easy Each is always
The English-French relations have not always been easy. Each is always arguing and accusing the other of wrong doings. All this hatred and differences started in the past, and this Quiet revolution, right after a new Liberal government led by Jean Lesage came in 1960. Thus was the beginning of the Quiet Revolution. Lesage had an excellent team of cabinet ministers which included Rene Levesque. The Liberals promised to do two things during the Quiet Revolution; one was to improve economic and so
Quebec's Quiet Revolution: What Is It?  How Has It Changed Quebec's So
Quebec's Quiet Revolution: What Is It? How Has It Changed Quebec's So
Quebec's Quiet Revolution: What Is It? How Has It Changed Quebec's Society? How Has It Affected Confederation? The English-French relations have not always been easy. Each is always arguing and accusing the other of wrong doings. All this hatred and differences started in the past, and this Quiet revolution, right after a new Liberal government led by Jean Lesage came in 1960. Thus was the beginning of the Quiet Revolution. Lesage had an excellent team of cabinet ministers which included Rene L
THESIS ESSAY
THESIS ESSAY
THESIS ESSAY The early nineteenth century was an era of tremendous growth and change for the new nation. This is a thesis statement that will be proven true in my essay. And why don’t I begin with one of our greatest presidents, Thomas Jefferson. On March fourth, 1801, Thomas Jefferson was elected President of the United States of America. Thomas Jefferson was a Republican. Republicans strongly supported farmers, and they wanted an agrarian nation. An agrarian nation means some changes had to b
History is said to be written by the winners but is it possible to rew
History is said to be written by the winners but is it possible to rew
History is said to be written by the winners, but is it possible to rewrite history? In a way, the French, like many who have preceded them, and many who will proceed them have done the impossible, rewriting history. From trivial folklore, such as George Washington chopping down a cherry tree, to the incredibly wrong, the African slave trade; people’s views of history can be shaped and molded. The French have done a superb job of instilling all of us with the concept that their Revolution was a
The Sedition Act
The Sedition Act
Word Count: 2107 The Sedition Act of 1798 For the first few years of Constitutional government, under the leadership of George Washington, there was a unity, commonly called Federalism that even James Madison (the future architect of the Republican Party) acknowledged in describing the Republican form of government-- “ And according to the degree of pleasure and pride we feel in being republicans, ought to be our zeal in cherishing the spirit and supporting the character of Federalists.” Althou
Jeffersonians Vs. Jacksonians
Jeffersonians Vs. Jacksonians
Jeffersonians Vs. Jacksonians The Washington administration was the first to bring together in the cabinet of the United States, the Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson and the Secretary of Treasury Alexander Hamilton. Jefferson and Hamilton began to take different views when the government began to address the issue of the old war debts and the worthless paper money left over from the days of the Confederation. Hamilton suggested that the government should create the Bank of the United States,
Essay on Jefferson
Essay on Jefferson
Essay on Jefferson Jefferson had destroyed political traditions. From his contradictions and defecting his priciples, Jefferson destroyed the political precedent and is a exemplatory hypocrite, which can be seen throughout his administration. Jefferson was an admired statesman who was grappling unsuccessfully with the moral issue of slavery. Thomas Jefferson, the author of the Declaration of Independence, opposed slavery his whole life, yet he never freed his own slaves. He championed Enlightenm
George Washington
George Washington
George Washington George Washington's memory is held in honor by his fellow countrymen and by the world. The enemies and critics who attacked him in war and in peace are now largely forgotten, but his name has become a byword for honor, loyalty, and love of country. He was known as the father of his country. Washington was a father in several ways. He was commander in chief of the American forces in the American Revolution, chairman of the convention that wrote the United States Constitutio
1776 vs 1789
1776 vs 1789
1776 vs 1789 The American and French Revolutions both occurred in the eighteenth century; subverting the existing government and opening the way for capitalism and constitutionalism. Because of these similarities, the two revolutions are often assumed to be essentially eastern and western versions of each other. However, the two are fundamentally different in their reason, their rise, progress, termination, and in the events that followed, even to the present. The American Revolution was not pr
Thomas Jefferson third President of the United States was one of the m
Thomas Jefferson third President of the United States was one of the m
Thomas Jefferson, third President of the United States, was one of the most brilliant men in history. His interests were boundless, and his accomplishments were great and varied. He was a philosopher, educator, naturalist, politician, scientist, architect, inventor, pioneer in scientific farming, musician, and writer, and was the foremost spokesmen for democracy in his day. He was born at Shadwell in Goochland County, Virginia on April 13, 1743, to Jane Randolph and Peter Jefferson. Jefferson G
John Quincy Adams was born in 1767 in Braintree now Quincy Massachuset
John Quincy Adams was born in 1767 in Braintree now Quincy Massachuset
John Quincy Adams was born in 1767 in Braintree (now Quincy), Massachusetts, and was the second child of two children. He was the sixth president of the United States, and devoted his life to serving the people. Of the 81 years he lived, 50 were spent in public office. His service ended only with his death at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. Adam’s career of public service was one of the most varied in the colonies. He served as a diplomat, senator, secretary of state, president, and, for t
In Federalist number nine five principles that are conducive to good g
In Federalist number nine five principles that are conducive to good g
In Federalist number nine five principles that are conducive to good government are discussed. The first is the regular distribution of power into distinct departments (Lawler 16). The federalists felt that the distribution of powers was important so that one department of government did not become more powerful than the other groups. They didn’t want a government that was ruled by one person or even one group of people. The first aspect in creating a democratic government was to insure that th
The French Revolution
The French Revolution
The French Revolution I. Absolutism A. Absolutism defined 1. In the absolutist state, sovereignty resided in kings--not the nobility or the parliament--who considered themselves responsible to God alone. 2. Absolute kings created new state bureaucracies and standing armies, regulated all the institutions of government, and secured the cooperation of the nobility. a. Some historians deny that absolutism was a stage of development that followed feudalism, but, instead, was administrative monarchy.
In Order to Form a More Perfect Union
In Order to Form a More Perfect Union
In Order to Form a More Perfect Union A.P. U.S. History 5th Hour At the end of the Revolutionary War, the United States was composed of thirteen very different states that all had very different priorities and ideas on how the new government should work. In order to form a government that all of the states would be willing to accept, there would have to be some very influential compromises. Among the significant compromises that the states made was the Checks and Balances program, the Bill of R
UNIFICATION UNDER LINCOLN
UNIFICATION UNDER LINCOLN
UNIFICATION UNDER LINCOLN Political thought has been based upon the “Hamiltonian” and “Jeffersonian” traditions throughout America’s history. These traditions reflect the evolution of the two major parties. “Hamiltonians” also known as Federalists at one time were the party that supported the rule of “best people.” Federalist John-Jay once said, “Those who own the country; ought to govern it.” (Bailey and Kennedy 199). “Hamiltonians” believed that government should support private enterprises an
Anti-Federalist
Anti-Federalist
Anti-Federalist PLS201 When the new federal Constitution was introduced in 1787, it met with much dissent. The Constitution was the groundwork for a new government, which would dissolve the existing confederation of states and replace it with a more powerful national government. Naturally, many people feared that this new government would be too powerful and rob the states and individuals of their sovereignty and rights. Those who wished to retain the Articles of Confederation as the framework f
General View of the Powers Proposed to be vested in the Union
General View of the Powers Proposed to be vested in the Union
General View of the Powers Proposed to be vested in the Union November 25, 20003 Federalists Papers (no. 41-44) Essay 3 Article I of the U.S. Constitution includes all of the listed powers of the legislative branch, as well as the elastic clause that allows for the stretching of the central legislative authority when needed. Article IV describes the subordinate relationship of the states to that central authority. This portion of The Federalist provides a thorough description and justification o
John Adams had three remarkable careers in his lifetime One as an enem
John Adams had three remarkable careers in his lifetime One as an enem
John Adams had three remarkable careers in his lifetime. One as an enemy of British oppression and champion of independence. As an American diplomat in Europe and as the first vice-president and second president of the United States. His diary, letters and speeches showed him to be very patriotic, a stong family man and tough-minded philosopher. Adams was born in Quincy, Mass. on October 30, 1735. He was born in a small house that is still standing and open to visitors. His father was a Deacon a
The First Ten
The First Ten
The First Ten by Alfred Steinberg I read 411 pages in The First Ten: The Founding Presidents and Their Administrations by Alfred Steinberg. This book gives an in-depth look at the first ten presidents of the United States of America. Because William Henry Harrison first became president in the election of 1840, I read only up to that point. The first eight presidents of the United States were among the best and brightest minds and political strategists in the early history of the United States,
Never before has the executive branch been faced with such scrutiny ab
Never before has the executive branch been faced with such scrutiny ab
Never before has the executive branch been faced with such scrutiny, abuse, and pressure. Historically, a stronger president renders a weaker legislature.Household names like Washington, Lincoln, and FDR had no problem exercising exclusive control of their respective America. Today, President Clinton has been successful in an economic sense however, his personal life has been exploited and he now faces impeachment hearings. Could America have selected a more efficient, moralistic president or h
Marbury v Madison
Marbury v Madison
Marbury v. Madison The 1803 Marbury v. Madison case resulted in the most important Supreme Court decision in history. The court’s ruling established the power of judicial review, solidified the Constitutional system of checks and balances, strengthened the power of the federal government, and made the Judiciary an equal partner with the Legislative and Executive branches of government. In the Election of 1800, Thomas Jefferson and his anti-federalist Republican party defeated the incumbent John
At the end of October in 1995 Canada came close to finally breaking up
At the end of October in 1995 Canada came close to finally breaking up
At the end of October in 1995 Canada came close to finally breaking up. Quebeckers took a vote on the 30th on whether or not their province should declare itself an independent nation. Most people and the media believe that the separatists would loose. The people drew these beliefs from a similar election help in 1980. Although in this recent poll, these scores were too close to call. The separatists were defeated by a one percent loss. The reason this past election was so close is due mainly t
It is emphatically the province and duty of the judicial department to
It is emphatically the province and duty of the judicial department to
“It is emphatically the province and duty of the judicial department to say what the law is . . .if a law be in opposition to the Constitution, . . .the court must determine which of these conflicting rules governs the case. That is the very essence of the Judicial Jury.” -Chief Justice John Marshall in his decision of Marbury vs. Madison “The judicial power of the United States, shall be vested in one Supreme Court, and in such inferior Courts as the Congress may time to time ordain and establ
The Contrasts of the Federalist Party and the Democratic-Republican Pa
The Contrasts of the Federalist Party and the Democratic-Republican Pa
The Contrasts of the Federalist Party and the Democratic-Republican Party Andrew Reich 8-4 With the creation of the United States Government two parties were formed. One party was the Federalist Party, and the other party was the Democratic-Republican Party. There were very few similarities between the two parties, yet there were quite a few contrasts between the two parties. Although it is often difficult to discern differences between today’s political parties, the Democrats and the Republica
Thomas Jefferson The Aristocrat as Democrat
Thomas Jefferson The Aristocrat as Democrat
Thomas Jefferson: The Aristocrat as Democrat Part 1 Section 1 Summary The Federalist view of Jefferson has never been popular, but the Jeffersonian view has been. Jefferson’s legend has been overly dramatized. Jefferson was born into aristocracy. When his father died, he was left with a large inheritance of land and many slaves. He had the time to write so many great works because of his many slaves. Although an aristocrat, Jefferson was compassionate towards the common man. He reasoned that me
According to John F Kennedy author of Profiles in Courage the most adm
According to John F Kennedy author of Profiles in Courage the most adm
According to John F. Kennedy, author of Profiles in Courage, the most admirable of all human virtues in courage. Courage reqireÌ#noglut tanvingôrua±jfirations, no magic, and no special combination of time, place, and circumstance. It is a time for each man to look deep into his own soul. Being politically courageous means standing up for the good of the country, no matter [email protected]Ÿ`on4fquncea. Iº#th¸#bo~k, Profiles in Courage, Kennedy discusses eight men, John Quincy Adams, Daniel Webster, Th
The Price of Speed
The Price of Speed
The Price of Speed: Railroads of the American West English 205s 2 Outline Introduction I. How the railroads promoted themselves A. To the Government B. To businesses C. To farmers and communities II. The founders actions A. Founders greed B. Founders profited C. Extravagance D. Mismanagement III. Results to Railroads A. Land Grant Scandals B. Bankruptcies E. Public disdain F. Government intervention Conclusion 3 The Price of Speed: Railroads of the American West A railroad, fellow citizens, is
Biography In the thick of party conflict in 1800 Thomas Jefferson wrot
Biography In the thick of party conflict in 1800 Thomas Jefferson wrot
Biography: In the thick of party conflict in 1800, Thomas Jefferson wrote in a private letter, I have sworn upon the altar of God eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man. This powerful advocate of liberty was born in 1743 in Albermarle County, Virginia, inheriting from his father, a planter and surveyor, some 5,000 acres of land, and from his mother, a Randolph, high social standing. He studied at the College of William and Mary, then read law. In 1772 he married
Hamilton vs Jefferson
Hamilton vs Jefferson
Hamilton vs. Jefferson When the United States was just a young country, many opinions were heard on how to run the new nation. Only a few people were actually listened to. Today we remember people like Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson as people who set precedents we still follow today. These two men often disagreed on most issues. They both had many good ideas and helped to pave the way for the United States to become the world power that it is today. The first president, George Washingt
Thomas Jefferson is remembered in history not only for being president
Thomas Jefferson is remembered in history not only for being president
Thomas Jefferson is remembered in history not only for being president, but also for his belief in the natural rights of man as and his faith in the people’s ability to govern themselves. He left an impact that few others in American history have. Born on April 13, 1743, Jefferson was the third child in the family and grew up with six sisters and one brother. Though he opposed slavery, his family had owned slaves. From his father and his environment he developed an interest in botany, geology,
During the years precceding and following the American revolution ther
During the years precceding and following the American revolution ther
During the years precceding and following the American revolution, there was a general radical attitude instilled in most everyone. But, there were the more radical people, mainly the poor, and the less radical people, mainly the upper-class. So, in a sense the revolution was a radical movement in which hardcore radicals were played as pawns while the more conservative radicals were driving the cause for their own interests, be it economic or simply politics. The outcome was, at the base, what
Great Chief Justice
Great Chief Justice
Great Chief Justice In today’s time most lawyers are not thought of as great minds. Instead they are thought of as cheats and trouble. In 1755, in Virginia, John Marshall was born. He was distantly related to Thomas Jefferson, author of the Declaration of Independence, but they shared no similarities. The main differences between these two men were their opposing political beliefs. Thomas Jefferson believed in state sovereignty while John Marshall thought that there should be a strong centraliz
Many peoples have contributed to the development of the United States
Many peoples have contributed to the development of the United States
Many peoples have contributed to the development of the United States of America, a vast nation that arose from a scattering of British colonial outposts in the New World. The first humans to inhabit the North American continent were migrants from northeast Asia who established settlements in North America as early as 8000 BC and possibly much earlier (see NORTH AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY). By about AD 1500 the native peoples of the areas north of the Rio Grande had developed a variety of different c
The British government took several steps to deal with the new territo
The British government took several steps to deal with the new territo
The British government took several steps to deal with the new territories and control the colonies. They made many restrictions on colonial trade, the powers of the colonial assemblies, on the access of the western lands, there was taxation for the first time, there was use of British troops even in peacetime, and modifications of the Massachusetts government in violation of its charter rights. As a result of these restrictions, Americans were outraged. They felt that Britian was depriving the
THOMAS JEFFERSON
THOMAS JEFFERSON
THOMAS JEFFERSON 1743-1826, intellectual, statesman, and third president of the United States. Although Jefferson served as governor of Virginia, minister to France, secretary of state, vice president, and president, he is remembered in history less for the offices he held than for what he stood for: his belief in the natural rights of man as he expressed them in the Declaration of Independence and his faith in the people's ability to govern themselves. He left an impact on his times equaled by
Development Of Major Political Parties In America
Development Of Major Political Parties In America
Development Of Major Political Parties In America Development of Major Political Parties in America The first two major polititcal parties were the Jeffersonian and the Federalists. The Jeffersonians believed in a decentralized government and foreign policy that supported France rather than England. The Federalists were in existance only a short time because of disagreement of the leaders, John Adams and Alexander Hamilton. The United States was a one party nation from 1800 to 1820. In 1828 the