English Literature Page 10

The Lord of the Flies: Themes The world had witnessed the atrocities of World War II and began to examine the defects of their social ethics. Man's purity and innocence was gone. Man's ability to remain civilized was faltering. This change of attitude was extremely evident in the literature of the age. Writers, who through the use of clever symbolism, mocked the tragedy of man's fate. One such writer was William Golding. An author who has seen the destruction of war and despises its inevitable r
Mark Twain and His Masterpiece: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn ________ A Research Paper Presented to Mr. Neil of Chula Vista High School ________ In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for English 10 Honors/Gate ________ By: Id #: 937228 May 16, 1996 Outline I. Samuel Clemens A. Who he is B. Where he was born C. Family II. How Samuel came to be Mark Twain A. His working life B. First writings III. The Adventures of Huck Finn A. Story Plot 1. The outside of the book 2. The inside of the
A Reflection On Herman Melville's Accomplishments Brad Jones Ms Carman Period 6 American Literature As an author Melville both courted failure and scorned success.(pg. 613, A Companion to Melville Studies). How many famous legends in time have existed to know no fame. How many remarkable artist have lived and died never receiving due credit for there work. Herman Melville is clearly an artist of words. Herman Melville is certainly a prodigy when it comes to writing. Herman Melville never recei
Bless Me, Ultima: The Cultural Distress of a Young Society An answer to the discussion question of whether or not there is a defined border culture would need a great number of years in field research, but we can also observe a few of the characteristics of such border culture just by looking at scholastic essays and books related to the topic. Within the research that I did, I found a number of scholars who, while defining the border, mention all the specific or special characteristics of this
The Old Man and The Sea: Analysis of Santiago Ross Mueller Mr. Harocopos AP. English 11 29 September 1996 Ernest Hemingway had a specific type of character in each and every one of his works of literature. These characters were called the Hemingway Code Heroes. Hemingway Code Heros followed a strict code of behaviors which allowed them to live their life to the fullest. These Heros lived simple lives without all the luxuries that others had. They concentrate on the problem at hand and do not get
The Stranger: Analysis Author: Albert Camus Pierre Palmer English II. Period #5 Date: 10/4/9 copyright, by Pierre Palmer I. Biographical Insights A. Albert Camus' cultures consist of being a novelist, literature and short story writer of many books. He wrote an essay on the state of Muslims in Algeria, causing him to lose his job and he moved to Paris. Albert Camus also joined the French resistance against the Nazis and became an editor of Combat, an underground newspaper. He was dissatisfie
The Scarlet Letter: Symbolism British Literature Matt Gordon 9-22-96 Symbolism in literature is the deepness and hidden meaning in a piece of work. It is often used to represent a moral or religious belief or value. Without symbolism literature is just a bunch of meaningless words on paper. The most symbolic piece of work in American Literature is Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter. Hawthorne's use of symbolism in The Scarlet Letter is one of the most significant contributions to the rise
Symbolism Use In: Young Goodman Brown and The Lottery The authors, Shirley Jackson and Nathaniel Hawthorne, both frequently use symbols within their stories The Lottery and Young Goodman Brown. Symbols are utilized as an enhancement tool to stress the theme of each story. Hawthorne uses names and objects to enhance the theme, and Jackson mainly utilizes names to stress the theme, although she does have one object as a symbol of great importance to the theme. The stories both contain symb
Brave New World: The Advancement of Science Christy Campbell Mrs. Doig Eng OAC 2 16 May, 1996 When thinking of progress, most people think of advances in the scientific fields, believing that most discoveries and technologies are beneficial to society. Are these advances as beneficial as most people think? In the novel Brave New World, the author Aldous Huxley, warns readers that scientific advances can be a threat to society. This is particularly evident in the fields of biology, technology and
The Power and the Glory by Graham Greene Book report by Allen Rabinovich It is the story-teller's task to elicit sympathy and a measure of understanding for those who lie outside the boundaries of State Approval. I. One day I gave The Power and the Glory to... a native of Mexico who had lived through the worst persecutions... She confessed that your descriptions were so vivid, your priest so real, that she found herself praying for him at Mass. I understand how she felt. Last year, on a trip thr
The Metamorphosis Kafka wrote The Metamorphosis in 1912, taking three weeks to compose the story. While he had expressed earlier satisfaction with the work, he later found it to be flawed, even calling the ending unreadable. But whatever his own opinion may have been, the short story has become one of the most popularly read and analyzed works of twentieth-century literature. Isolation and alienation are at the heart of this surreal story of a man transformed overnight into a kind of beetle.
The Outsiders: Character Changes In literature, a character often changes from the beginning to middle and to the end of a novel. In the novel The Outsiders, Ponyboy and Johnny undergo many changes. Ponyboy is an honor roll student and a good athlete in track. Pony also thought that his older brother Darry hated him because he was too strict with him. But when Pony's best friend Johnny died of injury from the church fire, Pony began to be in denial about Johnny's death. He started to drop grades
Edgar Allen Poe's Hop Frog: The Transcendence Of Frogs and Ourang-Outangs Hop-Frog!, I will make a man of you. In Edgar Allen Poe's short story Hop Frog, the title character Hop- Frog is able to transcend the limitations of his physical body, in ways the King and his seven ministers are unable. Hop-Frog has multiple examples of the transcendence of man, and the inability of man to transcend. The most prominent of these points are: 1. By overcoming the limitations of his, Hop-Frog's, phys
The Yellow Wallpaper: A Woman's Struggle Pregnancy and childbirth are very emotional times in a woman's life and many women suffer from the baby blues. The innocent nickname for postpartum depression is deceptive because it down plays the severity of this condition. Although she was not formally diagnosed with postpartum depression, Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1935) developed a severe depression after the birth of her only child (Kennedy et. al. 424). Unfortunately, she was treated by Dr. S
The Odyssey The Odyssey was full of wonder, power, and surprises. It is packed with epic heroes, creatures, gods, and goddesses. The gods, goddesses, and creatures had supernatural powers that effected the lives of Odysseus, his crew, and his family. Their actions proved to be powerful, benificial, and deadly. The gods, godesses, and creatures in The Odyssey on many occations proved to be powerful. Zeus, leader of the gods, was a prime example of this. When, “Zeus the lord of cloud roused in the
Ancient Greece Ancient Greece is a peninsula located off the Mediterranean Sea, and is surrounded by several islands. Ancient Greece was made up of different types of government. There were two types of city states an oligarchy , which is ruled by a small group of citizens and a direct democracy ruled by the people . All citizens could make speeches and vote at the Assembly. The Council made up of 500 citizens made new laws which were debated in the Assembly . Only citizens could vote ,women , f
Epic Works Epics by definition are long narrative poems, that are grand in both theme and style (Webster 417). They usually involve actions of great glory and are typically centered around historical or legendary events of universal significance. Most epics deal with the deeds of a single individual, however, it is not uncommon to have more than one main character. Epics embody several main features including: supernatural forces, sometimes the deity of the time, that shape the action; battles o
Fate: Would Homer and Virgil Be The Same Without It? In Virgil's Aeneid and Homer's Iliad, a picture of the supernatural and its workings was created. In both works, there is a concept of a fixed order of events which is called fate. Fate involves two parts. First, there are laws that govern certain parts of mens' lives, such as human mortality and an afterlife. Second, fate deals with the inevitable outcome of certain events, outcomes that cannot be changed by men or gods. Both Homer and Virgil
The History of Greek Theater Theater and drama in Ancient Greece took form in about 5th century BCE, with the Sopocles, the great writer of tragedy. In his plays and those of the same genre, heroes and the ideals of life were depicted and glorified. It was believed that man should live for honor and fame, his action was courageous and glorious and his life would climax in a great and noble death. Originally, the hero's recognition was created by selfish behaviors and little thought of service t
Henry IV: Appearance vs. Reality Shakespeare's play Henry IV begins with a king (King Henry) beginning a pilgrimage after killing King Richard II. Henry believes that by gaining the throne of England he has done an honourable deed, yet he admits that the fighting and bloodshed could continue, A. . . ill sheathed knife . . . @ (I.1.17). He, also, admits that his own son, Prince Hal, is not honourable enough to occupy the throne, Asee riot and dishonour stain the brow of my young Harry (I.1.17).
Macbeth: A Tale of Two Theories Macbeth(c.1607), written by William Shakespeare, is the tragic tale of Macbeth, a virtuous man, corrupted by power and greed. This tragedy could in fact be called A Tale of Two Theories. One theory suggests that the tragic hero, Macbeth, is led down an unescapable road of doom by an outside force, namely fate in the form of the three witches. The second suggests that there is no supernatural force working against Macbeth, which therefore makes him responsible fo
The Characteristics of Shakespeare's Comedies Shakespeare wrote many different forms of literary works and one of them is comedy. At the end of his professional life he had written four famous comedies which were later called his romances. Shakespeare's comedies were not primarily love stories but they all included a love plot. His romances all had the happy ending of a comedy, but in a way they hinted on violence (Prentice Hall Literature). His focus and emphasis was clearly towards the struc
The Merchant of Venice: A Tragic Play In my opinion the play The Merchant of Venice is a tragic one which is discised as being comic. Many factors of this play are derived from the current voice of situation. The Merchant of Venice could be looked at as more tragic because of the negative intents from some of the characters in the play. Greed and deception are just a couple of the main features from where many of the decisions are derived. For example, revenge was an intent that Sylock had again
The Grapes of Wrath: Symbolic Characters Struggling through such things as the depression, the Dust Bowl summers, and trying to provide for their own families, which included finding somewhere to travel to where life would be safe. Such is the story of the Joads. The Joads were the main family in John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath, a book which was written in order to show what a family was going through, at this time period, and how they were trying to better their lives at the same time. It
Macbeth: Macbeth A Victim of Circumstances Macbeth, a victim of circumstances or not? He was a victim of circumstances. The witches, Lady Macbeth, and Macbeth himself all contribute to the murdering of Duncan. The first of the three major circumstances Macbeth falls victim to is the witches' prediction. The third prediction that the witches make is that he will be king All hail, Macbeth, that shalt be king hereafter!1. The second of the circumstances is Lady Macbeth. Lady Macbeth, at first, sk
Analyzing The Struggle For Power In Four Novels: Fahrenheit 451, Invisible Man Lord of the Flies and Julius Caesar If you delve into the content of almost any novel, there is almost always some kind of struggle for power. It could be for rightful integration into society; power over an island; power over a country; or in some cases, even power over the minds of others. These not at all uncommon struggles for power are what keep us interested in the plot of a book. The ongoing battle between a ch
Julius Caesar: Military and Political Strength Perhaps no other man in the history of the world symbolizes military and political strength as much as does Gaius Julius Caesar. This man became a legend for his military exploits and an almost global setting, his political manipulations which covered decades of cycles which covered power and loss of power, and his personal life which to have been played in the most melodramatic and theatrical manner. It is Caesar whose life, betrayal , and death wh
Stephen Leasock's Arcadian Adventures With the Idle Rich: Satire Jonathan Swift has suggested that Satire is a sort of Glass, wherein Beholders do generally discover every body's Face their own; which is the chief reason...that so few are offended with it. Richard Garnett suggests that, Without humour, satire is invictive; without literary form, [and] it is mere clownish jeering. (Encyclopaedia Britannica 14th ed. vol. 20 p. 5). Whereas Swift's statement suggests that people are not offend
Criticism of The Sick Rose By analyzing more information from different authors, I was able to draw a greater amount contrast from the authors. I had a better feel for what they were trying to convey when they wrote their critical essays in their books. Whatever the case, it was easier to judge The Sick Rose by having more sources to reflect upon. Michael Riffaterre centers his analysis of The Sick Rose in The Self- sufficient Text by using internal evidence only [to analyze the poem] a
Dragons in America Ian Richards World Literature Hr. 3 9 September 1996 Monsters or dragons in present day America are feared .Monsters in America consist of politicians, celebrities, and criminals. In America they are portrayed through media, television, and movies. Monsters in America are feared but can also be seen as a source of entertainment. Media and entertainment create most of the fear in Americans. In the news we hear of shooting, killings, and rapes everyday. The media always gives a
Edgar Allan Poe: Reflection of His Pessimistic Moods in His Work Throughout literature, an author's works almost always reflect their mood and character. Edgar Allan Poe was an American writer whose short stories and poems reflected his pessimistic moods. One of Poe's poems, The Raven, is about a raven that flies into the home of a sad and lonely man. This poem best expresses Poe's sense of despair and gloominess because the literary elements used in the poem are a constant reference to them.
A Rose for Emily: Fallen from Grace A comparative essay on the use of symbolism in William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily. Authors traditionally use symbolism as a way to represent the sometimes intangible qualities of the characters, places, and events in their works. In his short story A Rose for Emily, William Faulkner uses symbolism to compare the Grierson house with Emily Grierson's physical deterioration, her shift in social standing, and her reluctancy to accept change. When compared chr
Human Nature: Exposed More than a century ago, Mark Twain probably composed the single-most important piece of American Literature to ever be composed. This work, widely known as The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, essentially follows young Huck on a series of adventures and experiences with his close friend (and runaway slave), Jim, as they both escape society's burdens. The novel, in a sense, encompasses everything good, bad and in between about and concerning the society of that time. A major
Interpreting Edith Wharton's Roman Fever Definitive criteria for judging the success or failure of a work of fiction are not easily agreed upon; individuals almost necessarily introduce bias into any such attempt. Only those who affect an exorbitantly refined artistic taste, however, would deny the importance of poignancy in literary pieces. To be sure, writings of dubious and fleeting merit frequently enchant the public, but there is too the occasional author who garners widespread acclaim an
The Major Years: Isolation and Emily Grierson - A Deadly Combination William Faulkner, one of the most famed writers of our times, explores in his writing the themes of alienation and isolation. He interweaves these themes with his female characters. In A Rose for Emily, Miss Emily Grierson is a woman who is alienated and lives in isolation from the people in her town. The theme of isolation is the focal point of the story, since it is what drove her to her madness. Faulkner's theme of alienatio
Juvenalian and Horatian Satire Satire is a sort of glass, wherein beholders do generally discover everybody's face but their own; which is the chief reason for that kind of reception it meets in the world, and that so very few are offended with it. Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. The Battle of the Books, Preface (written 1697; published 1704). Satire is known as the literary style which makes light of a subject, diminishing its importance by placing it in an amusing or scornf
Life Is But A Choice Greg McGuigan Beginning with the time of birth until the time of death, people have to make choices everyday on how to achieve the goals in their lives. One can imagine life as a long winding road with millions of other roads branching off in many directions. The only problem is that life is too short to explore every single road. In addition, the essence of time will not allow anyone to go back to a road that was passed. Everyone must choose his/her own roads through life r
Moby Dick by Cazi Brasga Honors English III 9/04/96 I. Biographical Insights A. The culture this great author was a part of was the time in American history where inspiring works of literature began to emerge. It was also a time when American writers had not completely separated its literary heritage from Europe, partly because there were successful literary genius' flourishing there. B. Herman Melville was born on August 1, 1819, he was the son of Allan and Maria Melville. During Herman's child
Krapp's Last Tape: Imagery in Color During the 20th century, there was an evident disillusion and disintegration in religious views and human nature due to the horrific and appalling events and improvements in technology of this time, such as the Holocaust and the creation of the atom bomb. This has left people with little, if any, faith in powers above or in their own kind, leaving them to linger in feelings of despair and that life is an absurd joke. From these times grew the Theater of Absurd
Beowulf: Themes The Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf is the most important work of Old English literature, and is well deserved of the distinction. The epic tells the story of a hero, a Scandinavian prince named Beowulf, who rids the Danes of the monster Grendel, a descendent of Cain, and of his exploits fighting Grendel's mother and a Dragon. Throughout the epic, the Anglo-Saxon story teller uses many elements to build a certain depth to the characters. Just a few of the important character elements in
Judith Guest's Ordinary People: Summary Ordinary People by Judith Guest is the story of a dysfunctional family who relate to one another through a series of extensive defense mechanisms, i.e. an unconscious process whereby reality is distorted to reduce or prevent anxiety. The book opens with seventeen year old Conrad, son of upper middle- class Beth and Calvin Jarrett, home after eight months in a psychiatric hospital, there because he had attempted suicide by slashing his wrists. His mother
Standardization of the English Language There are several important events before 1500 that when listed together show a series of steps in the struggle for English language supremacy. These steps are mainly governmental, legal and official events that pushed English usage. In 1356 The Sheriff's Court in London and Middlesex were conducted in English for the first time. When Parliament opened in 1362 the Statute of Pleading was issued declaring English as a language of the courts as well as of Pa
Superstition in the play The Crucible by Arthur Miller Grade Level: 10th Date Created: September 18, 1995 Grade Received: B Written by: Erica Hankinson [email protected] Superstition and witchcraft resulted in many being hanged or in prison. In the seventeenth century, a belief in witches and witchcraft was almost universal. In Salem Massachusetts where the witch trials take place many people who are suspicious is accused of witchcraft and hanged. Arthur Miller wrote a play called The Cru
The Effects of Catch 22 Justin Suissa November 05,1996 In literature sometimes a character can be helped or hindered by the economic, social, or political conditions of the day. In the novel Catch 22 by Joseph Heller, the character Doc Daneeka illustrates this idea perfectly because the conditions surrounding him greatly hindered him. Catch 22 takes place during WWII on an island named Pianosa that is close to Italy. Doc Daneeka is adversely affected by the war in the end because when it began h
The Sun Also Rises: A Review [I cannot express to you how glad I am that I am taking this class. I am thoroughly enjoying Hemingway. The Sun Also Rises is one of the best books I've read in quite a long time. For a while there, I was, for God knows what reason, taking Physics and Chemistry and Biology. It is really an adventure to be back with books and words and reading. I am also amazed that I never could read more of Him when it wasn't an assignment. And how is it that when I am told to write
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight: Test of One Knight's Chivalric Attributes Loyalty, courage, honor, purity, and courtesy are all attributes of a knight that displays chivalry. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is truly a story of the test of these attributes. In order to have a true test of these attributes, there must first be a knight worthy of being tested, meaning that the knight must possess chivalric attributes to begin with. Sir Gawain is self admittedly not the best knight around. He says
To Kill a Mockingbird: Summary The book To Kill a Mockingbird was written by Harper Lee. It was published in 1960 then it went on to win the Pulitzer prize in 1961 and was later made into an Academy Award winning film. Harper Lee always considered her book to be a simple love story. Today it is regarded as a masterpiece of American Literature. There are so many characters in this book that I can't name all of them. Here are most of the characters. The Finch family contains of Atticus (The head o
T. S. Eliot's The Hollow Men Thomas Stearns Eliot was born in St. Louis, Missouri of New England descent, on Sept. 26, 1888. He entered Harvard University in 1906, completed his courses in three years and earned a master's degree the next year. After a year at the Sorbonne in Paris, he returned to Harvard. Further study led him to Merton College, Oxford, and he decided to stay in England. He worked first as a teacher and then in Lloyd's Bank until 1925. Then he joined the London publishing fir
Why I Have No Hero American Literature Matt Robbins October 7, 1996 What is a hero? Does one have to have superpowers, special abilities or incredible talent to be considered one? Well, some of us seem to think so. Then there is the everyday teacher or local figure that is considered a hero to selected individuals in their community. To me a hero has to have a few selected qualities, and I haven't met anyone who can fulfill all three. First, a hero must be good at heart. A hero has to know how t
A Critical Analysis of Tension's In Memorial A. H. H. During the Victorian Period, long held and comfortable religious beliefs fell under great scrutiny. An early blow to these beliefs came from the Utilitarian, followers of Jeremy Bantam, in the form of a test by reason of many of the long-standing institutions of England, including the church. When seen through the eyes of reason, religion became “merely an outmoded superstition” (Ford & Christ 896). If this were not enough for the faithful to