Dostoevsky

AN ALTERNATIVE FOR PRISON
AN ALTERNATIVE FOR PRISON
AN ALTERNATIVE FOR PRISON America's prisons have been called graduate schools for crime. It stands to reason: Take a group of people, strip them of possessions and privacy, expose them to constant threats of violence, overcrowd their cell- block, deprive them of meaningful work, and the result is an embittered underclass more intent on getting even with society than contributing to it. Prisons take the nonviolent offender and make him live by violence. They take the nonviolent offender and ma
Convicting Raskolnikov Dostoevsky's views on Criminal Justice
Convicting Raskolnikov Dostoevsky's views on Criminal Justice
Convicting Raskolnikov Dostoevsky's views on Criminal Justice At the close of Crime and Punishment, Raskolinkov is convicted of Murder and sentenced to seven years in Siberian prison. Yet even before the character was conceived, Fyodor Dostoevsky had already convicted Raskolinkov in his mind (Frank, Dostoevsky 101). Crime and Punishment is the final chapter in Dostoevsky's journey toward understanding the forces that drive man to sin, suffering, and grace. Using ideas developed in Notes from Un
Suffering in Crime and Punishment
Suffering in Crime and Punishment
Suffering in Crime and Punishment In the novel Crime and Punishment, by Fyodor Dostoevsky, suffering is an integral part of every character's role. However, the message that Dostoevsky wants to present with the main character, Raskolnikov, is not one of the Christian idea of salvation through suffering. Rather, it appears to me, as if the author never lets his main character suffer mentally throughout the novel, in relation to the crime, that is. His only pain seems to be physical sicknes. Rask
Some people believe that most murderers have a mental illness which ca
Some people believe that most murderers have a mental illness which ca
Some people believe that most murderers have a mental illness which causes them to commit their crime. This belief is strongly disagreed with by the authors Edgar Allan Poe and Fyodor Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment, ďThe Tell-Tale HeartĒ, ďThe Black CatĒ,and ďThe Cask of AmontilladoĒ are very similar in this contradiction. Each murderer takes a specific journey that has been illustrated in each case. The psychological make-up of each murderer shows that he is a normal person up to the point a
CHARACTERIZATION
CHARACTERIZATION
CHARACTERIZATION The main characters of Dostoevsky’s novel The Brothers Karamazov are, as the title suggests, the members of the Karamazov “family,” if it can indeed be called such. The only things that the members of this family share are a name and the “Karamazov curse,” a legacy of base impulses and voluptuous lust. References to this tendency towards immorality are sprinkled heavily throughout the novel; phrases such as “a brazen brow and a Karamazov conscience,” “voluptuary streak,” and “K
The Crime at Compiegne
The Crime at Compiegne
The Crime at Compiegne Proving herself to be a good deal more than ordinary, Jeanne díArc, the Maid of Orleans and patron saint of France, united her nation at a critical hour in history and decisively turned the Hundred Yearsí War in Franceís favor, forever ending Englandís dreams of hegemony over France. The crimes and eventual triumph of this most amazing young woman are better understood when applied to Dostoevskyís extraordinary man theory. Dostoevskyís theory, as written in Crime and Pu
Exhausted Kendra leaned back against the tree The quiet of the night s
Exhausted Kendra leaned back against the tree The quiet of the night s
Exhausted, Kendra leaned back against the tree. The quiet of the night surrounded her, and in the distance she could see a small orange glow here and there of fires set by those who had been forced to leave their homes and set up camp in this park. She closed her eyes, rested her arms on her knees, and put her head down on her arms, cushioned by the sweatshirt she wore. The sweatshirt smelled of fresh air and smoke. She pulled the sleeves down over her cold hands. She sat like that for a while,
Priest and Chaplain The characters of the chaplain in Albert Camus The
Priest and Chaplain The characters of the chaplain in Albert Camus The
Priest and Chaplain The characters of the chaplain, in Albert Camusí The Outsider, and the priest, in Franz Kafkaís The Trial, are quite similar, and are pivotal to the development of the novel. These characters serve essentialy to bring the question of God and religion to probe the existentialist aspects of it, in novels completely devoid of religious context. The main idea visible about these two characters is that they are both the last ones seen by the protagonists, Mearsault and K., both n
Morality vs Crime and Punishment
Morality vs Crime and Punishment
Morality vs. Crime and Punishment AP English IV 8/27/03 ďThe old woman was merely a sicknessÖ I was in a hurry to step overÖ it wasnít a human being I killed, it was a principle! So I killed the principle, but I didnít step over, I stayed on this side. (Dostoevsky 274).Ē Raskolnikov is the main character in Dostoevskyís Crime and Punishment. Other important characters in Crime and Punishment include Sonia, a timid prostitute, and Marmaladov, an alcoholic public official and Soniaís father. This
What do you think have been the main themes of Russian writers in the
What do you think have been the main themes of Russian writers in the
What do you think have been the main themes of Russian writers in the 19th Century? All media forms, be they written or audio-visual reflect ideologies and themes of the era in which they are produced. 19th century Russian Literature similarly presents a pattern of themes and ideologies, relative to the social circumstances surrounding their creation. Many themes running through the Russian literature of this period parallels with the social change and political conflict of the time, bringing su
The concept of isolation of man being totally alone with nowhere to ru
The concept of isolation of man being totally alone with nowhere to ru
The concept of isolation, of man being totally alone with nowhere to run, permeates Fyodor Dostoevskyís novel, Crime and Punishment. Throughout the novel, Raskolnikov passes through different stages of isolation. He possesses different degrees of alienation because of different reasons which are all related to his theory about ordinary and extraordinary men. When he is planning the murder, his isolation is apparent but it reaches its height after he commits the murder of the pawnbroker and falls
Type and Structure of Crime and Punishment
Type and Structure of Crime and Punishment
Type and Structure of Crime and Punishment Crime and Punishment is a psychological novel that deals with Raskolnikovís aspirations to transcend pity, guilt, and the desire for companions. He is mentally tormented due to his intellectual disgust with his compassionate and submissive nature that suffers for othersí pain. Both of Raskolnikovís personalities are personified in the novel. The embodiment of the cold, intellectual side of Raskolnikovís character is Svidrigailov, who cares little of oth
Suffering in Crime and Punishment
Suffering in Crime and Punishment
Suffering in Crime and Punishment In the novel Crime and Punishment, by Fyodor Dostoevsky, suffering is an integral part of every character's role. However, the message that Dostoevsky wants to present with the main character, Raskolnikov, is not one of the Christian idea of salvation through suffering. Rather, it appears to me, as if the author never lets his main character suffer mentally throughout the novel, in relation to the crime, that is. His only pain seems to be physical sickness. Ras
Dostoevsky
Dostoevsky
Dostoevsky Dostoevsky first presents Smerdyakov, in The Brothers Karamazov, in Book 3 of Part 1. The author divulges details of the conception of the fourth son of Fyodor Pavovich Karamazov. Late on a September evening, a drunk Fyodor, by modern standards, rapes a homeless woman. Stinking Lizaveta, the victim of Fyodor's violence, was a legend in the town. Regardless of her unattractive and dirty appearance, her poverty, and homelessness, the townspeople regarded her with sympathy and compassion
Raskolnikov's Vivid Dream
Raskolnikov's Vivid Dream
Raskolnikov's Vivid Dream Raskolnikovís Vivid Dream In Crime and Punishment, Dostoevsky portrays the main character, Raskolnikov, in a complex and unique fashion. He could have been portrayed as the good guy, bad guy, or just your average man on the street, but Raskolnikov is displayed with more than just one persona. His range of actions and emotions is more of a Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde type character. On the outside, he appears to be in control of his situation, but he is full of turmoil on the
Existence of Man
Existence of Man
Existence of Man For centuries man has grappled with the riddle of what it means to be a person. But the questions Who is man? and What is the meaning of life? are still unanswered. Yet, while man is still a long way from arriving at any acceptable definitions, there is deep within everyone the hint of an idea of what it means to be a whole person, that is happy, functioning and fulfilled. So, throughout history man has made a continuous search to find out what makes him whole. Every person is d
Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment Raskolnikov's Mathematical Evaluatio
Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment Raskolnikov's Mathematical Evaluatio
Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment: Raskolnikov's Mathematical Evaluation of Moral Dilemma Presented To Him Exemplifies The Empirical View of Utilitarianism One death, and a thousand lives in exchange--it's simple arithmetic. -Raskolnikov Raskolnikov's mathematical evaluation of the moral dilemma presented to him in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment exemplifies the empirical view of utilitarianism. Utilitarianism attempts to distinguish between right and wrong by measuring a decision based on i
Crime and Punishment Protagonist and Antagonist Essay
Crime and Punishment Protagonist and Antagonist Essay
Crime and Punishment: Protagonist and Antagonist Essay Crime and Punishment is considered by many to be the first of Fyodor Dostoevsky's great books. Crime and Punishment is a psychological account of a crime. The crime is double murder. A book about such a broad subject can be made powerful and appealing to our intellectual interests if there is a link between the reader, the action, and the characters. Doestoevsky makes all these links at the right places. The action takes place between the pr
With Which Literary Character Do You Most Readily Identify Why Alexei
With Which Literary Character Do You Most Readily Identify Why Alexei
With Which Literary Character Do You Most Readily Identify? Why?: Alexei in Dostoevsky's The Gambler The literary character that I most readily identify with would be Dostoevsky's Alexei, The Gambler. I can relate to him because like me, he is a man of many passions. He is also all but helpless against his addiction to gambling. I have also felt helpless to certain circumstances in my life, as have we all. He is capable of much more than what his society allows him to be. That is to say he may
A DEFENSE OF INDIVIDUALISM Based On Foydor Dostoevsky's NovelNotes Fro
A DEFENSE OF INDIVIDUALISM Based On Foydor Dostoevsky's NovelNotes Fro
A DEFENSE OF INDIVIDUALISM Based On Foydor Dostoevsky's Novel:Notes From The UNderground Fyodor Dostoevsky's novel, NOTES FROM THE UNDERGROUND, has held many labels, such as being a case history of nuerosis or a specimen of modern tragedy. The most popular label it has obtained however, is being the author's defense of individualism. The novel is writen as a performance, part triad, part memoir, by a nameless personage who claims to be writing for hiomself but consistently maipulates the reader-
Crime And Punishment Is There Or Is There Not Such A Thing As Crime
Crime And Punishment Is There Or Is There Not Such A Thing As Crime
Crime And Punishment: Is There Or Is There Not Such A Thing As Crime? Crime and Punishment: Is There or is There Not Such a Thing as Crime? For this question, I have chosen to discuss the following three works of literature: Crime and Punishment, by Feodor Dostoevsky, Beloved, by Toni Morrison, and Utopia, by Sir Thomas More. To begin with an omniscient and philosophical frame of reference, crime is only defined as crime by the society defining it. When a mass of human beings coagulate to¬ geth