A Cathode Ray

Photography is a technique of producing permanent images on sensitized
Photography is a technique of producing permanent images on sensitized
Photography is a technique of producing permanent images on sensitized surfaces by means of the photochemical action of light or other forms of radiant energy. In today's society, photography plays important roles as an information medium, as a tool in science and technology, and as an art form, and it is also a popular hobby. It is essential at every level of business and industry, being used in advertising, documentation, photojournalism, and many other ways. Scientific research, ranging from
The V chip-waste of governments time and money
The V chip-waste of governments time and money
The V chip-waste of governments time and money AS WE MAY THINK by VANNEVAR BUSH THE ATLANTIC MONTHLY, JULY 1945 ---------------------------------------------------------------------- This article was originally published in the July 1945 issue of The Atlantic Monthly. It is reproduced here with their permission. The electronic version was prepared by Denys Duchier, April 1994. Please E-mail comments and corrections to [email protected] -----------------------------------------------------
Television
Television
Television The start of the television market all began in 1897 by K.F. Braun. He invented the cathode ray tube which would become the screen of most television sets. In 1925 C. Francis Jankins had used some ideas from a Scottish engineer, A. A. Campbell, to create images on the screens. The United States navy used this new technology to transfer images back and forth to its ships. In 1929 David Sarnoff invested $50 million dollars into the development of television sets. In 1935 Sarnoff commit
Radioactivity and Types of
Radioactivity and Types of
Radioactivity and Types of Radiation Henri Becquerel Henri Becquerel was a french scientist who discovered radioactivity. Becquerel knew that florescent screens in cathode ray tubes did not only glow when struck by electrons, but also emitted X-rays. Since certain minerals like uranium would glow when illuminated by sunlight, Becquerel thought that they too might be able to emit X-rays when fluorescing. The Experiment Becquerel first wrapped a photographic plate with black paper to prevent expo
1 An atom is the smallest particle of an element that retains the chem
1 An atom is the smallest particle of an element that retains the chem
1. An atom is the smallest particle of an element that retains the chemical identity of that element. 2. Atomic theory- a) Each element is composed of extremely small particles called atoms b) All atoms of a given element are identical,, but they differ from those of any other element c) Atoms are neither created nor destroyed in any chemical reaction. d) A given compound always has the same relative numbers and kinds of atoms. 3. His ideas were rejected because he was unable to explain what he
How many times can one cut a piece of gold in half A Greek philosopher
How many times can one cut a piece of gold in half A Greek philosopher
How many times can one cut a piece of gold in half? A Greek philosopher named Democritus was the first in a long line of scientists and mathematicians to try to answer this very difficult question. Around 450 BC, Democritus stated that all mater was composed of particles that he called atomos (where the English word atom comes from) and that these particles could not be cut. This went against the present day theory of Aristotle which was that matter could be cut infinitely. Unfortunately for Dem
Mini-Research
Mini-Research
Mini-Research ELECTRON- In 1897, Sir J. J. Thomas, an English physicist, measured the deflection of cathode-ray particles in magnetic and electrical fields. As a result he found the ratio of the charge, e, to the mass, m, of the cathode-ray particles. He found e/m identical to those particles irrespective of the metal the electrodes were made of or the kind of gas in the tube. In 1909, RA Millikan, an American scientist, measured that charge. All electrons are found to be identical no matter the
The Atom
The Atom
The Atom AP Physics Period 2 In the spring of 1897 J.J. Thomson demonstrated that the beam of glowing matter in a cathode-ray tube was not made of light waves, as the almost unanimous opinion of German physicists held. Rather, cathode rays were negatively charged particles boiling off the negative cathode and attracted to the positive anode. These particles could be deflected by an electric field and bent into curved paths by a magnetic field. They were much lighter than hydrogen atoms and wer
The First Generation of Computers
The First Generation of Computers
The First Generation of Computers The first generation of computers, beginning around the end of World War 2, and continuing until around the year 1957, included computers that used vacuum tubes, drum memories, and programming in machine code. Computers at that time where mammoth machines that did not have the power our present day desktop microcomputers. In 1950, the first real-time, interactive computer was completed by a design team at MIT. The Whirlwind Computer, as it was called, was a re
History Of Math
History Of Math
History Of Math IS 490 SPECIAL TOPICS Computer Graphics May 6, 1996 Table of Contents Introduction 3 How It Was 3 How It All Began 4 Times Were Changing 6 Industry''''''''s First Attempts 7 The Second Wave 10 How the Magic is Made 11 Modeling 12 Animation 13 Rendering 13 Conclusion 15 Bibliography 16 Introduction Hollywood has gone digital, and the old ways of doing things are dying. Animation and special effects created with computers have been embraced by television networks, advertisers, and
Stephanie Chang
Stephanie Chang
Stephanie Chang US History II Honors Mr. Eastwick 5/6 7 June 2004 4th MP Research Paper Because we live in such a technologically advanced world, it is hard for some people to imagine a time without Internet, cell phones, and television. Communication in today's world is instantaneous, even if the news is coming from all the way around the world. The Internet makes accessing worldwide and national events as easy as clicking a mouse, and cell phones help family and friends keep in touch. But the
The Science Behind Web Colors
The Science Behind Web Colors
The Science Behind Web Colors The Science Behind Web Colors: The technological advancements of the late twentieth century has introduced artists to a new type of medium, the web. Beneath the Web’s complex jumble of hyperlinks, documents, and multimedia offerings lies a programming language that keeps all the content in its place. Without this ubiquitous, yet often unseen HTML code to hold the Web together, the medium itself could not exist, and cyberspace would be a vastly different experience