THE GREAT GATSBY

NAME: XXXXXXXX DATE: 3/20/97 PERIOD: 1

TOPIC: In a well-developed essay, demonstrate how the following passage conveys the theme of
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

And as I sat there, brooding on the old unknown world, I thought of Gatsby\'s wonder when her
first picked out the green light at the end of Daisy\'s dock. He had come a long way to this blue lawn and
his dream must have seemed so close that he would hardly fail to grasp it. He did not know that it was
already behind him, somewhere back in that vast obscurity beyond the city, where the dark fields of the
republic rolled on under the night.
Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by tear recedes before us. It eluded
us then, but that\'s no matter - tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther… And one fine
morning---
So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.


Dwelling in the Past

In The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Gatsby determined to gain something he had lost in
the past, Daisy\'s hand in marriage. The above passage conveys the theme of the story by showing how had
Gatsby dreamed of his goal, even though Daisy was past his reach he continued to dwell on what could
have been. For all purposes, the theme of The Great Gatsby is; One can\'t dwell in the past, once something
is done and over, one must move forward. Once Gatsby met Daisy, he immediately fell in love with her.
He dated her, and asked for her hand in marriage. But he was poor, and "Rich girls don\'t marry poor boys,
Jay Gatsby." Tom Buchannon came in with great gifts and despite Daisy\'s promise to wait, Tom and Daisy
were married. In the passage from the book, it says, "He had come a long way to this blue lawn and his
dream must have seemed so close that he could hardly fail to grasp it." Gatsby was determined to become
rich, no matter how, so he could marry Daisy Buchannon. !
This is where the theme begins to come in; you cannot dwell in the past. "He did not know that it was
already behind him, somewhere back in the vast obscurity beyond the city…" This statement from the
passage demonstrates Gatsby\'s inability to cope with the past. Even when Tom, Daisy, Nick, Jordan, and
Gatsby were in the hotel and Daisy announced she wasn\'t available, Gatsby pressed on. He stayed outside
her window until 4:00 in the morning to make sure she was all right. He was devoted to something that
was not available to him and he couldn\'t accept it. Towards the end of the book, it seemed that Gatsby
seemed he might move forward and go on with his life. But "so we beat on, boats against the current,
borne back ceaselessly into the past." Gatsby would never forget what could have been. He wanted his
dream so bad that he "stretched out [his] arms farther…" He became more entangled with this mess which
led to his murder by Wilson. For that, he will always be in the !
past, and not in the present. Jay Gatsby continued to strive for his unobtainable goal. From this comes the
theme of the book. He didn\'t learn the lesson that one has to move forward, and this cost him his life. The
passage shows the theme by showing how he reached his wealth, stretched out for Daisy\'s hand in
marriage, and continued after failure.