The Dodo Bird

Scientific and Common Name: When Portuguese sailors first arrived on an uninhabited island a bird
greeted them without fear. Since the bird had never seen a human before, it had no reason to be afraid. The
sailors thought that the bird was stupid so they named it dodo, Portuguese for fool. The scientific name is
Raphus cucullatus; the dodo was also referred to as a dronte. Another theory of how the dodo got it\'s name
is that the Portuguese tried to imitate the "doo" like noise the bird made and named it dodo. The Dutch
named the bird walghvogel; meaning disgusting bird.
Bibliography:
The Tragedy of the Dodo, http://www.fan.net.au/dodo/dodo/background.html
Balouct, Jean-Christopher; Extinct Species of the World. Auckland, New Zealand: Barron\'s Educational
Series, Inc. 1990
Silverberg, Robert; The Auk, the Dodo, and the Oryx. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Company. 1967


Time of Existence: The dodoes of Mauritius were discovered in 1507, and all were killed by 1681.
Bibliography:
Bergman, Jerry. "The Dodo Bird...An Example of Survival of the Fittest", Creation Magazine, Sep-Nov
1995; pg. 46


Home Range: The dodo bird lived on Mauritius; an island in the Indian Ocean.
Bibliography:
Bergman, Jerry. "The Dodo Bird...An Example of Survival of the Fittest", Creation Magazine, Sep-Nov
1995; pg. 46


Anatomy: The dodo is often been perceived as an incredibly overweight bird that couldn\'t move at a
significant speed. It is estimated that the dodo weighed as much as 20 to 23 kilograms and was two and a
half feet tall. The dodo was all blue-grey except for a plume of white feathers on its rear and a white breast.
Dodoes didn\'t have any feathers around their face and their skin contrasted greatly with their yellow iris.
The dodo had a blackish hooked beak with a reddish sheath. The bill was large at about nine inches long
and could be opened unusually wide. The nasal openings of the dodo were located much further down on
the beak than on most other birds. The bird had splay-toed feet. The most amazing feature of the dodo bird
was that it had small weak wings making the dodo one of the few flightless birds. It is believed that the
dodo was once a flying bird in Africa. When it flew to Mauritius it found no need for its wings and thus
they became smaller and useless. The dodo la!
cked the large pectoral muscles that birds need to fly. When the dodo stopped flying its breastbone
transformed to be much flatter. The dodo also had a strong girdle, legs, and pelvic bones due to its
flightlessness.
Another theory on the dodo bird\'s appearance was started by Andrew C. Kitchener. He believed
that the dodo bird was thin and weighed between 10.6 and 17.5 kilograms. Kitchener found that there were
many drawings that contained thin dodoes. They were usually drawn by people who had been to the island
where as many of the paintings containing larger birds were drawn by artisans. Kitchener also looked at
hundreds of bones and was able to replicate what the flesh looked like using methods of criminologists and
archaeologists. After he was finished the dodo looked similar to the thinner drawn birds.



1) Plume of Feathers 4) Nostrils far down on beak
2) Lack of Skin on Face 5) White Breast
3) Long Beak 6) Splay-Toed Fee


Bibliography:
Balouct, Jean-Christopher; Extinct Species of the World. Auckland, New Zealand: Barron\'s Educational
Series, Inc. 1990
Bergman, Jerry. "The Dodo Bird...An Example of Survival of the Fittest", Creation Magazine, Sep-Nov
1995; pg. 46
The Dodo Bird Page, http://www.halcyon.com/halo08/dodo.html
The Tragedy of the Dodo, http://www.fan.net.au/dodo/dodo/anatomy.html
"Dodo," Grizimek\'s Animal Encyclopedia, 1972
Silverberg, Robert; The Auk, the Dodo, and the Oryx. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Company. 1967


Physiology: The dodo like all birds was warm blooded. Before the arrival of humans, the dodo had no
enemies and lived in a great abundance. Once humans arrived, the dodo had to fight to survive for the first
time in its life. With the dodo\'s lack of speed and inability to fly or swim, it had little chance of survival.
The female dodoes laid one egg in a nest on the ground.
Many eyewitnesses have stated that because of the size of the dodo it was slow and clumsy.
Several suggest that the dodo could barely waddle away from the humans and sometimes its belly would
drag on the ground when it walked. Andrew Kitchener, however,