Sexual Discrimination Policies

Sexual discrimination and or harassment can vary in many forms, already having been explained in the prior paragraphs. Each case and sincerio may vary, but the guidelines that are followed in resolving these issues are usually very clear and written out in black and white. Rules for teaching and dealing with sexual harassment cases may vary from different organizations such as military, colleges, and state and federal guideline for the work place, which will be, explained more in depth in the following.
All military facilities have sexual harassment policies set up within each organization. The Air Force has there policy outlined in areas such as prejudice, identifying the problem, self evaluation, and your role and responsibility only to name a few. The Air Force sexual harassment training that begins as early as Basic Training and continues with each new assignment the member goes to. This is to make sure that all personal are clears that the Air Force has a no tolerance policy on sexual harassment, which means that any inappropriate behavior, remarks, or gestures will not be tolerated.
When and if such a situation does arise facilities such as Social Actions have been set up to assist any member or DOD official with a possible sexual harassment case. The Navy has similar programs set up to deal with sexual harassment situations. Their success in preventing these types of events from happening is shown through statistics taken by DOD and Navy surveys. "From1989 to 1995 the number of women who report being sexually harassed dropped from 42% to 29% for enlisted and from 26% to 15% for officers.” They have an Equal Opportunity/ Sexual Harassment Advice Line set up for all navy and civilian workers, it was established in 1992.
Almost all schools today have guidelines set up for students and faculty on how to deal with sexual harassment. These rules can be accessed either in your school administrative office or in most cases on the Internet. Similarly to the military most schools have training course set up for freshman or new students at the school so the are aware of their rights as well as the rights of the other students. These guidelines refer to areas like what the faculty can do about sexual harassment, knowing your rights, keeping records, and reporting complaints. Some schools even go as far as to educate the student body on how to safe guard parties and where to go for help to keep their campus safe. Literature and pamphlets should be available at each school to help the students and faculties feel safe from unwanted sexual harassment and to know how to get help.
The Supreme Court and EEOC have made very specific and strict guidelines on what the rights are for the employee and the employer in the work place. “Sexual harassment is an unlawful employment practice under Title VII of the civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended.” The Supreme Court says the policy must be posted on sexual harassment in the workplace and is distributed to all employees and their immediate supervisor. When a case is reported it must be investigated immediately so appropriate action can be taken. The EEOC stress the individual rights not to be subjected to work in a hostile environment. A single incident is not cause for a hostile environment. EEOC recognizes that there might not be a witness. Therefore, they must rely solely on the credibility of the victim’s allegation. It also stresses the employer responsibility to provide a safe work environment and if sexual harassment is reported, it must be dealt with in a speedy and proper manner.
Many sexual harassment cases go to court and even the Supreme Court. Sexual harassment is not limited to just men or women, we can all be victims. The important thing to remember if you ever are harassed is where to go and follow the proper steps to assure that your case will be dealt with in the best and quickest possible manner. No matter weather, you are in the military, college, or a civilian workplace.