Periodic Patterns of Elements

Purpose:
This paper is designed to explain how elements can be arranged according to patterns in the properties of their compounds.
Hypothesis:

I believe that the properties of the compounds will categorize the

compounds in a similar fashion as the periodic table arranges non-metals. I

am thinking that the non-metals and metals will react to differently to the

universal indicator, whereas one will turn the solution more blue and one

more of a reddish color.

Procedure:

A small sample of the solids and 5.0mL of the liquids were put in to test tubes. 5.0mL of water were added to each of the test tubes and the solids were stirred to completely dissolve them. 3 to 4 drops of the universal indicator solution were added to each test tube.
Data:
Please see attached sheet, (fig. A)
Analysis
I found that the universal indicator turned red, orange or yellow when non-metal oxides were placed in the universal indicator (compounds C, G, H, I). Using this indication, we can hypothesize that C, G, H, and I are non-metals and were liquids. I placed these to the right of my periodic table, family IV, as seen in bold:
(I) (II) (III) (IV)
E C
F H
D G
K I
The compound labeled 'D' was the fifth liquid tested. It, however, turned the liquid a violet color. It was separated from the other liquids based on this property (in bold):
(I) (II) (III) (IV)
E C
F G
D H
K I

Also turning the universal indicator a violet color were compounds 'E' and 'K'. These compounds being solid, however, were placed in family II, a family with similar properties of family III. Other elements in this family would have properties of a weak base and would probably be metals.
(I) (II) (III) (IV)
E C
F G
D H
K I

The final group is the 'I' family, containing compound 'F'. This element is a solid that turned the universal indicator a blue color, showing signs of a strong base. It was the strongest base, most likely a metal and was placed to the left of the table.
(I) (II) (III) (IV)
E C
F G
D H
K I
Conclusion:

I have found that the reaction of the compounds with the universal indicator shows the compound's metal/non-metal properties. It is also able to help you classify tested elements in to distinct groups based on reaction. The non-metals turned the indicator red, orange and yellow. The metals turned the indicator a blue or violet color.


















Figure A
Compound State of Matter Solubility Indicator Color Family
C Liquid ------- Red IV
D Liquid ------- Purple III
E Solid Little Purple II
F Solid Little Turquoise I
G Liquid ------- Red IV
H Liquid ------- Red IV
I Liquid ------- Red IV
K Solid Little Purple II