Patricide



In the time of the Romans, the punishment for patricide was to be sewn up in a sack that had a monkey,

snake, rooster, and dog inside, and then to be thrown in a river. Each of the animals in the bag had some

specific meaning to them, and being sewn up in a sack and tossed into the river also had a specific function

to the murderer. Thus this punishment became the proper way to punish the guilty.

In the Roman era, patricide had become a major problem, so it was decided that for whomever

held a title in Rome, there would be a meeting to discuss how to get rid of the problem and punish

appropriately. The title holders decided that the best way to punish the young men, and to stop them from

thinking of committing the sin, was to make them die, as well as make them feel everything their father

had, and to regret their crime. This decision then became the chosen consequence for the crime of

patricide.

The significance of the animals was to torture the perpetrator in a particular way for his crime. The

importance of the snake was that the snake was evil, dating back to the Garden of Eden, where it posed as

the Devil and deceived Eve. While the victim was alive, the snake would be there to remind him of the

ultimate sin-the deception of oneís own father. The rooster is primarily known for his crowing, and thus

his crows would remind the sinner of his guilt, so that he couldnít escape from what he did. The dogís

function in the sack would be to howl, not only to be deafening and frightening, but also to evoke the wrath

of the gods upon him. The monkey represents torture, because it is capable of mimicking human actions.

It would mimic the sonís behavior and re-enact the murder of the sonís All four of these animals perform

at least one role in torturing the boy, and so that he would be forced to think about what he had done to his

father.

The purpose of the sack was to increase tenfold the agony which his father suffered, and also to

make him regret his decision to kill his father. With each passing moment, the torment would get

progressively worse, so that the boy would get a taste of the Hell that was to be his afterlife, as punishment

for committing patricide. The sack represented a way in which to make the boy suffer much more, and

quickly before he drowned.

The son was thrown into the river so that he could feel the way his fatherís panic when he killed

him. The water would serve to scare the son in the way his father felt when he realized that his own son

had turned on him. The sewn sack would prevent the sonís escape so he would realize there would be no

turning back from his actions.

These different elements of punishment combined to make the murderer truly suffer each aspect of

the crime through the torture. The closed sack with animal reminders of different aspects of the murder

would serve as a deterrent to living observers. This ritual is a fitting punishment for the crime.