In what ways does Miller succeed in making the moment when Proctor tears up his confession particularly dramatic? In your answer you may consider the pressures he is under both to sign the confession and to destroy it.


In the Crucible when Proctor tears up his confession Miller creates a dramatic climax using several methods.


Throughout the play Miller\'s stage directions are precise and emotive but particularly during the majority of Act Four which revolves around John Proctor\'s confession. Miller\'s stage directions are consistent and precise - giving no room for individual interpretation of how the characters are feeling and the dramatic tension in this closing period to the play. For example: Act Four where John is alone with Elizabeth discussing whether he should confess or not, Miller\'s stage directions describe his movement “…as though in physical pain, slowly rising to his feet with a great immortal longing…” In the final scene when Proctor tears up his confession, Miller\'s stage directions become frequent and almost poetic in his deep, dramatic descriptions of John Proctor, his movements and emotions, in the speech where John tears up his confession Miller\'s stage direction reads: "…( with a cry of his whole soul ) …" such directions for Proctor help to create a very dramatic atmosphere to this final scene as we can picture his emotions and his body language with extreme precision, the dramatic descriptions are used to describe other characters around this point which creates an all round dramatic atmosphere to the moment as it describes the whole tension in the play - Parris\' reaction to Proctor\'s tearing of his confession "… hysterically, as though the tearing paper were his life …"


Another way in which Miller creates such a dramatic atmosphere around John Proctor tearing his confession is the build up to this moment. The events leading up to this moment help set the scene, this final build up, after the court case with Marry Warren, starts around when Hale and Danforth approach Elizabeth Proctor trying to convince her to persuade John to sign the confession - In this scene Hale and Danforth know that John is innocent, this is the perfect beginning of the build up to John\'s final scene as it shows the perversion of justice which has taken place in Salem this is shown through the way in which Miller has changed Hale and Danforth\'s characters as they can both see that John is innocent and wish him to confess to save his life and their reputations in some cases.


Hale is trying to show Elizabeth that it is better John lies and signs the confession than his life be taken away over pride "…for it may well be that god damns a liar less than he that throws his life away for pride…" The desperation that Miller portrays in Hale makes this scene more dramatic and the whole situation surrounding Proctor - as Hale is knowledgeable about witchcraft and he who once was suspicious of Proctor has now realised he was wrong and an innocent man may hang. In this scene Elizabeth\'s callous attitude towards Hale and Danforth is very dramatic as it creates a tension as we are left unknowing as to whether she will try to convince her husband to confess or not. This scene is also around the beginning of a \'countdown\' of several scenes building up to when Proctor is due to hang. The way in which Miller has written these scenes is very dramatic as it leaves the reader unknowing to Proctor\'s fate until nearly the very end of the play, with each page continuing the climax of dramatic proceedings which reach a breaking point with Proctor tearing up his confession.


Hale is trying to show Elizabeth that it is better John lies and signs the confession than his life be taken away over pride "…for it may well be that god damns a liar less than he that throws his life away for pride…" The desperation that Miller portrays in Hale makes this scene more dramatic and the whole situation surrounding Proctor - as Hale is knowledgeable about witchcraft and he who once was suspicious of Proctor has now realised he was wrong and an innocent man may hang.