English and Secondary Education

A girl sat in the middle of a full classroom. She went unnoticed by her classmates and by the professor standing at the chalkboard. The girl listened to the day’s lecture as if in a trance. Her teacher talked with such enthusiasm about the piece the class was studying. He went on about how the writer manipulated words and their connotations, and the writer’s ability to manipulate the English language. Her teacher continued to praise the writer for his ability to hold the audience’s attention and sway their opinions away from the norm. Her teacher’s love for English Literature and his ability to make the subject so interesting allowed her to see the true value of English in today’s society.
I was that girl. I was the girl that my high school English teacher inspired to pursue her desire to become an English Teacher. But not just any English teacher. I don’t want to be a second grade English Teacher that teaches how to form three word sentences. I want to be an English Teacher that is known to make her class think and form their own opinions. I want to be able to assign a writing assignment that will evoke some form of thought, and get a response besides the standard, “I don‘t know.“
English is no longer a subject to me. It is the ability to communicate your thoughts and opinions on paper. Today, English is a necessity. Without English, society will pass you by, not stopping to even consider you for the job market. Communication is the only way to get anywhere in society. I want to be able to teach that, the ability to communicate one’s ideas, opinions, desires, needs, and wants through pen and paper.
This career responds to my values and beliefs. I believe that an education is a must, and to be able to get an education communication is a must. I value the written word, and love to read new, fresh ideas from people developing their ability to communicate their own ideas.
Today, the population is booming. Children entering the public school system are met with a shortage of teachers, large class sizes, and no one on one help from individual teachers. Christian Allman, a freelance writer, said in his article, Careers in Education, “The demand for teachers is expected to increase significantly over the next few years.[ .... ] Public school enrollment, next year, is expected to swell to the largest levels in 25 years” (Allman 1). With the population continuing to grow, the demand for qualified teachers will continue to grow over the next few years.
The large demand for educators is found in large cities and medium towns. Rural communities still have a demand for qualified teachers, but not as demanding as the metropolitan cities. Rural communities are in search for Mathematics and Science teaches, while larger cities are looking for Technology, Bilingual, and English teachers. Relocation is not required, but it may become necessary to find the desired position.
As the demand increases, those who wish to become educators should start planning their own education. To be an educator a bachelor’s degree in the area to be taught and two to four years experience. Some people choose to major in education. Others major in a subject area, and then, they work toward their certification in education. The more education a person has increases his or her chance of being hired.
Once hired, wage comes into question. A teacher just starting out is likely to earn between 26,000-35,000 dollars annually. With demands for educators on the rise, signing bonuses have become popular and are not included in annual pay. Of course, with most all careers, the more experience and education the more money to be made. On average teachers make a high of 53,000 dollars annually. Keep in mind that these numbers are for careers in Secondary Education. (Salary information came from the Internet site Salary.Com.)
Throughout my life, I have admired all my teachers, and their ability to reach at least some of their students. My former teachers have all voiced their admiration of my desire to join them in the constant quest to educate the up-coming generations. As Bo Dailey, a graduate of the