CHILD ABUSE


Child Abuse is a major problem in our society today. According to child protective service (CPS) agencies in the United States. Child Abuse and neglects shows 1.7% increase over the number children reported in 1996. More people are starting to report child abuse, reporting levels have increased 41% between 1988 and 1997.
There are four forms of child maltreatment: emotional abuse, neglect, physical abuse and sexual abuse.

Emotional Abuse: Also known as: verbal abuse and mental abuse. Includes acts or the failures to act by parents or caretakers that have caused or could cause serious behavioral, emotional, or mental disorders. This can include parents/caretakers using extreme and /or bizarre forms of punishment. For example: putting a child in a closet or dark room or being tied to a chair for a long period of time or threatening or terrorizing a child.

Neglect: It's a failure to provide for the child's basic needs. Neglect could be physical, educational, or emotional. Physical neglect could be not providing food or clothing, appropriate medical care, supervision, or proper weather protection. Educational neglect is failure to provide schooling or special educational needs. For example: Not helping them on homework or teaching them how to read. Emotional neglect includes the lack of any emotional support and love.

Physical Abuse: The inflicting of physical injury upon a child. This may include, burning, hitting, punching, shaking, kicking, beating, or otherwise harming a child. Even if the parents or caretaker didn't intended to hurt the child, but the injury in not an accident.

Sexual Abuse: Is an inappropriate sexual behavior with a child. Like fondling a child's genitals, making the child fondle the adult's genitals, intercourse, incest, rape, and sexual exploitation. To be considered child abuse these acts have to be committed by a person responsible for the care of the child. For example: a baby sitter, parents, daycare provider, or related to the child.

Number of child abuse and neglects reports nationwide:
In the 1997 survey, the percentage from the 1986 survey has undergone some shifts. In 1997, physical abuse represented 22% of confirmed cases, sexual abuse 8%, neglects 54%, emotional maltreatment 4%, and other form of maltreatment 12%. In 1986 when approximately 26% of the children were reported for physical abuse, 16% for sexual abuse, neglect was 55%, and 8% for emotional maltreatment.

Child Fatalities:
Today many young children remain at high risk of loss of life. Between 1995 and 1997, 78% of children under the age of five, at the time of there death, while 38% were less than one year of age. Cause of death was from neglect, physical abuse, and combination of neglectful and physically abusive parenting. About 41% of these deaths occurred to children known to child protective service agencies. Since 1985, the rate of child abuse fatalities has increased by 34%




Viable Solution:
Child abuse is a problem; there are some viable solutions, on preventing abuse. In the United States public concern about the growing incidence of child abuse had led to making laws of both state and federal legislation. Although the focus remains on identifying, treating, and reporting cases of abuse, prevention efforts are increasing. Almost all the states today had established resources for child abuse prevention services.
One of the services is a "Family support Service." It will provide immediate assistance to parents in time of stress; the program should be available on a 24-hour basis and should have a telephone hot line, crisis caretaker, crisis counseling, and crisis baby-sitters. This program will help parents facing immediate problems, and could receive immediate support. Although this service may not to helpful to some parents, it will be helpful to others.
Other services parents could receive is going to a counseling group, which would help them about there problems, teaching them how to control there anger, so they won't put it out on there children.

Abusees inevitably become abusers:
One question we might have in mind is that: Do abusees inevitably become abusers themselves? Child abuse is a global problem and is just not happening in the U.S. Incidents of abuse occur among all religious, ethnic, and racial groups. Among these, the relationship between poverty and abuse is strong. Most vast majority of fatalities involves parents and caretakers from the poorest families. Studies have shown that most child-abusing parents were abused children themselves while other researchers assert