Chicken Pox

Chicken Pox is a childhood terror and an adult fear. Chicken Pox is blister-like rashes that can cover most of the body. You see red bumps that become blisters, then become scabs. The rash comes in crops, so the child usually has different stages of the rash at the same time. One of the only long-term effects this disease can give is normally, when the scabs fall off, the skin may remain dark for a while or even turn into scars that last a lifetime.

Chicken Pox is a very high communicability illness caused by the varicella-zoster virus. It is carried in saliva and mucus and can be spread when an infected person coughs or sneezes or by tiny droplets on surfaces touched by infected people. Then the virus hides in the brain or the nerves. It incubates for one to three weeks before the rash shows up on the body. Once a person has chicken Pox, the virus stays in an inactive state in the body's nerve cells. In some people, the virus becomes active again later in life and causes shingles, a condition with pain in the infected nerve and a rash on the body or face.

The usual symptoms of the Chicken Pox virus are rashes, illness, slight fever, itchy nose, fatigue and loss of appetite. The course of this virus is you start to feel ill and you get a minor fever with a stuffy nose, then fatigue with the loss of appetite and finally the blister-like rashes appear. Inside the blisters are infected liquids. These blisters can be very itchy. Over several days the rash spreads to the face and limbs. As time goes on the blisters begin to dry out and become scabs.

Since the Chicken Pox virus is a virus and a virus is not curable you have to try and prevent symptoms. To prevent Chicken Pox you should get the Chicken Pox vaccine as soon as possible. To control fevers make comfortable baths and use acetaminophen. Keep nails short and clean to prevent infection from scratching. Also you should use medicines and lotions to relieve itching.

History- Chicken Pox and Shingles were described in literature before the 6th century. At the end of the 19th century Chicken Pox was identified as different from Small Pox. In 1995 the first vaccine was used in the U.S.